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Thursday, 17 August 2017

Swedish diesel-electric submarine Nordkaparen 1959-


Of the Draken-class consisting of the Dolphin, Dragon, Griffin, Springaren, Wolf and Nordkaparen, preceded by the Hajen-class and succeeded by the Näcken- and Sjöormen-classes. General technical class specifications. Displacement 770 (surfaced)-950 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 69,3 x 5,1 x 5,3 metres or 227 x 17 x 17 feet. Speed 17 (surfaced)-22 (submerged) knots. Crew numbered 36 men. Armament consisted of 4-53,3cm/21” bow torpedo tubes for which 12 torpedoes were carried. Built by Kockums, Malmö and navy yard Karlskrona, Sweden. Laid down in 1959, launched on 8 March 1961, commissioned on 4 April 1962, decommissioned in 1988 and since 1993 museum ship at Gothenburg. 

Russian torpedo boats under construction at Reval, Estonia according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 6

An item reported that Creusot was building at Reval [nowadays Tallinn, Estonia] was building for the Russian navy torpedo boats with a displacement of 1.260 tons, dimensions 98 x 9,34 x 2,78 metres. Armament consisted of 2-10,2cm guns, 2 machineguns and 4-45cm torpedo launchers mounted on deck. The machinery consisted of 2 Curtiss turbines and 4 double boilers supplying 3.000 hp allowing a speed of 35 miles. 

Experiments with marine police organisation on board of British battle cruiser HMS Queen Mary according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 6

An item reported that on board of the British battle cruiser HMS Queen Mary was experimented with reorganizing the marine police on board. Usually performed by one master at arms supported by 5 corporals were now 15 petty officers of different departments responsible for maintaining the order. After she was commissioned was until her departure towards sea the original organisation restored.(1)

Note
1. Preceded by the Lion-class, succeeded by the Tiger, building ordered under the 1910-1911 Naval Programme, laid down by Palmers Shipbuilding and Iron Company, Jarrow, England on 6 March 1911, launched on 20 March 1912, completed in August 1913, commissioned on 4 September 1913 and sunk in the Battle of Jutland by hits of the German battle cruiser SMS Derfflinger on 31 May 1916. 

Romanian destroyers built at Naples, Italy according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 6

An item reported that the 4-1.500 tons destroyers under construction by Pattison, Naples, Italy for Romania were each to fitted out with 2 turbines of the Tosi-design placed in the Italian torpedo boats. Horsepower 40.000 ehp at 500rpm should allow a speed of 35 miles. Turbines for backwards moving delivered 13.000 ehp. The destroyers had as dimensions 07 x 9,5 x 3 metres and a displacement of 1.300 (trial)-1.450 (full loaded). Armament consisted of 3-12cm guns, 7-7,6cm guns and 2 torpedo launchers. 

French destroyer Hussard performed well during her trials according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1909-1910 no. 6

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht reporting that the Hussard (1) one of the new large French destroyers completed her official trial and achieved a speed of 29,9 miles while the contracted speed was 28 miles. She was the second ship of the Chasseur type which executed so easy the full speed trial.(1)

Note
1. Of the Spahi-class, consisting of the Aspirant Herber, carabinier, Enseigne Henry, Hussard, Lansquenet, Mameluck and Spahi, preceded by the Claymoe-class, succeeded by the Voltigeur-class, launched by Ateliers et Chantiers de la Loire, Nantes, France on 12 September 1908, completed in September 1911 and stricken in March 1922. 

French destroyer Chasseur executed her trial with success according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1909-1910 no. 6

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau reporting that the French destroyer Chasseur built by Chantiers et ateliers Augustin Normand, Le Havre, France performed the official full speed trial. Achieved a speed of 30,4 miles while 28 miles was guaranteed. The 2-shaft 4 Parsons turbines made by the Compagnie Electro-Mécanique du Borget developed at a speed of 28 miles a power of 7.200 hp at 850 rpm.(1)

Note
1. 2. Of the Chasseur-class consisting of the Chasseur, Actée, Cavalier, Fantassin and the Janissaire, preceded by the Voltigeur-class and succeeded by the Bouclier-class, launched by Chantiers et Ateliers Augustin Normand, Le Havre, France on  20 February 1909 and stricken in October 1919.

Several French torpedo boats and destroyer Espignole stricken according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1903-1904 no. 7

An item referred to the magazine Rundschau reporting that the French torpedo boats No.’s 58-59, 72, 123 and Edmon Fontaine and the destroyer Espignole were stricken. 

New burner tested on board of French battleship Suffren according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1903-1904 no. 7

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht dated 10 October 1903 reporting that on board of the French battleship Suffren a burner invented by engineer M. Merlu was tested with success good results that the navy probably was going to use it.(1)

Note
Preceded by the Iéna and succeeded by the République-class. 1. Building ordered on 21 April 1898, laid down at the Arsenal de Brest, France on 5 January 1899, launched on 25 July 1899, commissioned on 3 February 1904 and torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-52 off Lisbon, Portugal on 26 November 1916. 

Wednesday, 16 August 2017

American diesel-electric submarine USS Hardhead (SS-365) 1943-1972 and Greek submarine Papanikolis (S114) 1972-1993


Laid down by Manitowoc Shipbuilding Company, Manitowoc, Washington, USA on 7 July 1941, launched on 12 December 1943, in active service 18 April 1944-10 May 1946, 6 February 1952-22 May 1952, conversion into a Guppy IIA type, 24 March 1953-26 July 1962, handed over to Greece and renamed Papanikolis (S114), stricken 1993 and broken up.

Of the Balao-class, preceded by the Gato-class and succeeded by the Tench-class. General original technical specifications 1.526/1.550 (surfaced)-2.424/2.463 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 92,05 x 8,31 x 5,13 (maximum) metres or 311.9 x 27.3 x 16.10 feet. The machinery consisted of 4 Fairbanks-Morse Model38D8 10-cylinder opposed pistons diesel engines driving electric generator and 4-high sped Elliott electric motors with reduction gears and 2-126cell Sargo batteries delivering 5.400 shp (surfaced)-2.740shp (submerged) via 2 screws  allowing a speed of 20,25 (surfaced)-8,75 (submerged) knots and a range of 11.000 nautical miles while surfaced with a speed of 10 knots. The submerged endurance with a speed of 2 knots was 48 hours. Endurance on patrol 75 days. Diving depth 120 (test) metres or 400 feet. Crew numbered 8-81 men (included 10 officers). The armament consisted of 6-53,cm/21” torpedo tubes forward and 5-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes aft for which 24 torpedoes were carried and furthermore 1-12,7cm/5” /25cal gun and 4cm Bofors and 2cm Oerlikon cannon. General original technical specifications after conversion displacement 1.848 (surfaced)-2.440 (submerged) tons, fitted out with a snorkel one diesel engine and generator were removed with as result a surfaced speed of 13,5 (cruising)-17,0 (maximum) and while submerged 3,0 (cruising)-8,0 (snorkelling)-14,1 (during ½ hour) knots. The torpedo armament remained although all guns were removed. 

Russian submarine Zvezda (P2) 1931-1956


Laid down at the Ordzhinikidze Yard at St. Petersburg, Russia in 1931, launched in 1935 and broken up in 1956. Of the Pravda-class or P-class submarines consisting of the Pravda (P1), Zvezda (P2) and Iskra (P3); the fourth boat was never built. Of the Baltic Fleet. Originally designed in (October) 1930 to support battleships on long range operations. It became clear that due to the weak double hull construction which was divided into 8 compartments, worse seagoing qualities, powerless machinery and asking too much time during diving the boats less suitable were for attack-defence purposes. Instead were they used for training purposes and during the Second World War mainly for transport tasks. Stiffening and weight cutting were used to strengthen the hulls. The Pravda sunk on 17 September 1941, the sails of the Zvezda and Iskra were later modernized similar to the K-class. The building started in 1931 and was not earlier completed as five years later.

General technical specifications. Displacement 1.200 (surfaced)-1.870 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 90,0 x 3,0 metres. The machinery consisted of 2 shaft diesel-electric engines delivering 1.400 (electric)-5.400 (diesel) hp allowing a speed of 20,5 (surfaced)-11,8 (submerged) knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 5.700 nautical miles. The diving depth was 100metres or 100 340 feet. Crew numbered 54 men. The armament consisted of 6 torpedo tubes (4 bow, 2 stern) for which 10 torpedoes were carried, 2-10cm guns and 1-4,5cm gun. 

Russian submarine Iskra (P3) 1931-1952


Laid down at the Ordzhinikidze Yard at St. Petersburg, Russia in 1931, launched in 1935 and broken up in 1952. Of the Pravda-class or P-class submarines consisting of the Pravda (P1), Zvezda (P2) and Iskra (P3); the fourth boat was never built. Of the Baltic Fleet. Originally designed in (October) 1930 to support battleships on long range operations. It became clear that due to the weak double hull construction which was divided into 8 compartments, worse seagoing qualities, powerless machinery and asking too much time during diving the boats less suitable were for attack-defence purposes. Instead were they used for training purposes and during the Second World War mainly for transport tasks. Stiffening and weight cutting were used to strengthen the hulls. The Pravda sunk on 17 September 1941, the sails of the Zvezda and Iskra were later modernized similar to the K-class. The building started in 1931 and was not earlier completed as five years later.

General technical specifications. Displacement 1.200 (surfaced)-1.870 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 90,0 x 3,0 metres. The machinery consisted of 2 shaft diesel-electric engines delivering 1.400 (electric)-5.400 (diesel) hp allowing a speed of 20,5 (surfaced)-11,8 (submerged) knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 5.700 nautical miles. The diving depth was 100metres or 100 340 feet. Crew numbered 54 men. The armament consisted of 6 torpedo tubes (4 bow, 2 stern) for which 10 torpedoes were carried, 2-10cm guns and 1-4,5cm gun.

Russian submarine Pravda (P1) 1931-1941


Laid down at the Ordzhinikidze Yard at St. Petersburg, Russia in 1931, launched in 3 January 1934 and sunk off Hango, Finland on 17 September 1941. Of the Pravda-class or P-class submarines consisting of the Pravda (P1), Zvezda (P2) and Iskra (P3); the fourth boat was never built. Of the Baltic Fleet. Originally designed in (October) 1930 to support battleships on long range operations. It became clear that due to the weak double hull construction which was divided into 8 compartments, worse seagoing qualities, powerless machinery and asking too much time during diving the boats less suitable were for attack-defence purposes. Instead were they used for training purposes and during the Second World War mainly for transport tasks. Stiffening and weight cutting were used to strengthen the hulls. The Pravda sunk on 17 September 1941, the sails of the Zvezda and Iskra were later modernized similar to the K-class. The building started in 1931 and was not earlier completed as five years later.

General technical specifications. Displacement 1.200 (surfaced)-1.870 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 90,0 x 3,0 metres. The machinery consisted of 2 shaft diesel-electric engines delivering 1.400 (electric)-5.400 (diesel) hp allowing a speed of 20,5 (surfaced)-11,8 (submerged) knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 5.700 nautical miles. The diving depth was 100metres or 100 340 feet. Crew numbered 54 men. The armament consisted of 6 torpedo tubes (4 bow, 2 stern) for which 10 torpedoes were carried, 2-10cm guns and 1-4,5cm gun. 

Turkey buying destroyers from Germany according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1910-1911 no. 7

An item reported that Turkey bought 4 destroyers from Germany and that in Germany already 4 new ones as replacement were laid down. Earlier tidings spoke from torpedo boats. 

Danish navy choose for budget reasons for Whitehead built submarine according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1910-1911 no. 7

An item reported that the Danish director of naval shipbuilding at Copenhagen, Denmark stated that just for budget reasons was chosen for a Whitehead-submarine instead for a second Fiat submarine. The first Danish submarine was the Dykkeren. The Whitehead submarine was preferred above the German Germania submarine while the first better suited to the Danish demands.(1)

Note
1. Launched by Fiat San Giorgio Shipyard, La Spezia, Italy on 18 July 1909, commissioned on 29 September 1909, sunk during an training on 9 October 1916, salvaged in 13 October 1916, decommissioned on 13 June 1917 and sold to be broken up. 

Several submarines for British Royal Navy under construction according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1910-1911 no. 7

An item reported that at the moment 6 submarine were under construction for the British Royal navy of which 3 were to be completed that same year. At Chatham were 2 D-class submarines (1) laid down and on 8 June was the C-34 launched.(2)

Notes
1. This were to be the D9 and D 10 but in fact launched as E1 respectively E 2 on 9 November 1912 and 23 November 1912.
2. Laid down at the HM Dockyard Chatham on 29 March 1909, launched on 8 June 1910, commissioned on 17 September 1910 and sunk by the German submarine U-52 off Fair Isle, Shetland on 17 July 1917. 

Repair costs of French submarine Pluviôse very high according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1910-1911 no. 7

An item reported that the budget for repairing the French submarine Pluviôse was estimated to be 400.000-500.000 francs with on the other hand even important objections against the repairs. Building costs of a new submarine of this type were 1,8 million francs.(1)

Note
1. The Q 51. Laid down at the Arsenal de Cherbourg, France on 27 May 1905, launched on 27 May 1908, commissioned on 10 May 1908, sunk due to a collision with the packet boat Pas de Calais off Calais, France on 26 May 1910, salvaged, repaired and recommissioned, stricken in 1919 and sold to be broken up in 1925. 

New precautions for French submarines at sea after the accident with the Pluviôse according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1910-1911 no. 7

An item reported that as result of the accident with French submarine Pluviôse new measures were made for submarine at sea. The submarines were to be escorted by a ship to warn passing steamships. Coastal stations were to show special signals and submarines were not allow to use passing ships as potential targets. The minimum diving depth was 16 metres before moving and when she came to the surface was the engine to be stopped and via underwater receiver listened for the noise of turning screws. The periscopes were to be lengthened with another 4 metres and each submarine was to be fitted out with a signal mast showing a flag. (1)

Note
1. The Q 51. Laid down at the Arsenal de Cherbourg, France on 27 May 1905, launched on 27 May 1908, commissioned on 10 May 1908, sunk due to a collision with the packet boat Pas de Calais off Calais, France on 26 May 1910, salvaged, repaired and recommissioned, stricken in 1919 and sold to be broken up in 1925. 

French destroyer Cavalier harassed by turbine problems during trials according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1910-1911 no. 11

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht reporting that the new French destroyer Cavalier which performed so well during the last trials was yet not available for service. When the turbines were examined after the trials were broken rotor blades discovered. This seemed to become a common problem while earlier the Chasseur had the same and also the battleship Voltaire seemed to be suffering from this problem known as Schaufalsalat.(1)

Note
1. Of the Chasseur-class consisting of the Chasseur, Actée, Cavalier, Fantassin and the Janissaire, preceded by the Voltigeur-class and succeeded by the Bouclier-class, launched by Chantiers et Ateliers Augustin Normand, Le Havre, France on 9 May 1910, training ship since 1914 and stricken in December 1927. 

Tuesday, 15 August 2017

German 15th Century cog Die Bunte Kuh of Hamburg


Deutsches Schiffahrtsmuseum Bremerhaven August 2017

Original painting made by Hans Borhdt (1857-1945) in 1901 representing the Hanseatic cog Die Bunte Kuh which under command of Simon of Utrecht (14th Century-14 October 1437) made a end of the terror by the pirate Claus Störtebeker (around 1360-20 October 1401. He is in 1380 for the first time mentioned in 1380 in court documents of Wismar. Störtebeker was active in the Baltic for the Swedish against the Danes around 1389 and since 1396 he chose the side of the Frisians against the Dutch. He was taken prisoner by Simon of Utrecht off Heligoland and beheaded after a trial in 1401 although newest sources pointed out that he executed in 1400 and that the story of Simon of Utrecht and his in 1401 completed Die Bunte Kuh was not true. 

German ocean going tug Seefalke 1924-

Deutsches Schiffahrtsmuseum Bremerhaven August 2017

Built by Joh. C. Tecklenborg AG Bremerhaven-Wesermünde in 1924 for account of Reederei W. Schuchmannn. Sunk in the Second World War during an Allied air attack on Kiel, refloated but scuttled by her owner. After 1950 salvaged, repaired and modernized and decommissioned in 1970. Crew numbered 19 men. Machinery consisted of 2-6 cylinder diesel engines delivering 2x1.650hp allowing a speed of 13,5 knots. Gross register tonnage 619 tons and as dimensions 58,50 x 9,00 x 4,40 metres. MMSI 5317276. 

German submarine (ex-U2540 1944-1960) Wilhelm Bauer 1960-

Deutsches Schiffahrtsmuseum Bremerhaven August 2017

XXI- design. Laid down by Blohm&Voss, Hamburg, Germany on 29 October 1944, launched on 13 January 1945, commissioned on 24 February 1945, used a s training ship for the 31.Unterseeboootsflotille, scuttled near the lightship of Flensburg on 4 May 1945, salvaged in June 1957, repaired by Howaldtswerke, Kiel, Germany, renamed Wilhelm Bauer and research vessel 1 September 1960-28 Augustus 1968, crewed with civilians and used for testing modifications for the new Type 206 submarine, collided with the German destroyer D172 on 6 May 1969, decommissioned on 15 March 1982, sold, restored to the Second World War appearance and since 27 April 1974 museum ship. Displacement 1.620 (surfaced)-1.820 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 76,7 (over all) x 8 x 6,32 (draught) x 11,30 (height) metres or 251.8 x 23.6 x 20.9 x 37.1 feet. Crew numbered 57 men. Speed 15 (surfaced)-17 (submerged) knots. Armament consisted of 6-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes. And 4-2cm/0.79“ C/30 anti aircraft guns. 

German customs cruiser Wami 1893-1916

Model Deutsches Schiffahrtsmuseum Bremerhaven

Built by Jos L. Meyer-Werft, Papenburg an Ems, Germany in 1893 to be used on the Tanganika Lake in German East Africa.(1) Displacement 25,3 cubic metres and as dimensions 16,00 (between perpendiculars) x 3,65 (maximum over thrushes) x 1,30 (design draught) x 2,00 (hold at side) metres. Horsepower 85,5ihp. Speed 10 knots.(2)

Notes
1. German East Africa to be located in the African Great Lakes region including what nowadays is known as Burundi, Rwanda and partly Tanzania [earlier called Tanganyika]. After the First World War divided between Belgium, Portugal and the United Kingdom.
2. In February 1916 deliberately ran ashore to escape the Allied forces and burned. Apparently later refloated by the British forces and commissioned. 

Japan increasing settlements along Korean coast according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1910-1911 no. 7

An item reported that Japan increased her settlements along Korean coast spending a large amount of money including ƒ 140.000 for building barracks at Tong-Heung, ƒ 80.000 for a naval station at Kojho and ƒ 728.000 for a naval station in the Bay of Chinhai. 

Submarine for Portuguese account built in Italy according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1910-1911 no. 7

An item reported that in Italy a submarine was built for Portuguese account with a displacement of 245 (surfaced)-300 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 45,15 x 4,20 metres. Speed 8 (submerged)-13 (surfaced) miles. To fitted out with 2 periscopes. 

Italian submarine Foca decommissioned voyage according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1910-1911 no. 7

An item reported that the Italian submarine Foca was repaired after her accident in April 1909 and already decommissioned.(1)

Note
1. Laid down by Fiat, San Giorgio, Mugganiao, Italy in April 1907, launched on 8 September 1908, commissioned on 15 February 1909, stricken on 16 September 1918 and broken up. Of the Foca-class with as sister ship the Swedish Hvalen. Designed by engineer Cesare Laurenti was this the first Laurenti type until 1918. 

American submarine USS Viper making non-stop voyage according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1910-1911 no. 7

An item reported that the American 135 tons submarine Viper made a non stop voyage of 487 miles from Charleston, USA-Annapolis, USA.(1)

Note
1. Launched by Fore River Shipbuilding Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA on 30 March 1907, commissioned on 18 October 1907, renamed B-1 on 17 November 1911 and sunk while used as a target after she was decommissioned at Cavite, Philippines on 1 December 1921. 

Austro-Hungarian navy building submarine salvage vessel annex depot ships for submarines and torpedo boats according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1910-1911 no. 7

An item reported the building at Fiume [Rijeka, Crouta] of a salvage vessel for submarines and which was at the same time to serve as a mother ship for submarines and torpedo boats. Dimensions 64,20 (between perpendiculars) x 10 metres and a displacement of around 1.500 tons. The machinery consisted of 2-2,500 hp engines and 2 water tube boilers with a heating boiler. To be fitted out with 2 centrifugal pumps with a capacity of 1.900 cubic metres/hour and 2 pumps with a capacity of 1.100 cubic metres/hour, 2 movable pumps with steam boiler with a capacity of 550 cubic metres, 2 movable pumps with internal combustion motors with a capacity of 1.350 cubic metres and 2 movable electric centrifugal pumps with a capacity of 200 cubic metres. Further more would she have 2 steam winches of each 15 tons, air pumps, air accumulators and a storage for all the stores needed on board of torpedo boats and submarines, diver equipment, engine cranes and a repair workshop. 

Russian torpedo boat 1st class Vzriw (1877) in 1896

Of the Baltic Fleet. Launched at St. Petersburg, Russia in 1877, dimensions 118 x 16 x 10.9 feet, displacement 160 tons, 1 screw, horsepower 800 ihp, maximum trial speed 14.5 knots, coal bunker capacity 16 tons, crew numbering 19 men and an armament of 4 quick firing guns and 1 torpedo tube.

Source
Brassey’s Naval Annual for 1896. 

Russian torpedo boat 1st class Vindawa (1886) in 1896

Of the Baltic Fleet. Launched at Elbing, Germany in 1886, dimensions 128 x 15.7 x 7,5 feet, displacement 87 tons, 1 screw, horsepower 900 ihp, maximum trial speed 21 knots, coal bunker capacity 17 tons, crew numbering 13 men and an armament of 4-1p revolvers and 2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Brassey’s Naval Annual for 1896. 

Russian torpedo boat 1st class Tosna (1893) in 1896 Of the Baltic Fleet. Launched at Putiloff, St. Petersburg, Russia in 1893, dimensions 127.9 x 15.7 x 6,9 feet, displacement 98 tons, 1 screw, horsepower 1.250ihp, maximum trial speed 21 knots, coal bunker capacity 30 tons an armament including 2 quick firing guns. Source Brassey’s Naval Annual for 1896.

Of the Baltic Fleet. Launched at Putiloff, St. Petersburg, Russia in 1893, dimensions 127.9 x 15.7 x 6,9 feet, displacement 98 tons, 1 screw, horsepower 1.250ihp, maximum trial speed 21 knots, coal bunker capacity 30 tons an armament including 2 quick firing guns.

Source
Brassey’s Naval Annual for 1896. 

Russian torpedo boat 1st class Viborg (1886) in 1896

Of the Baltic Fleet. Launched at Clydebank, Scotland in 1886, dimensions 144.5 x 17 x 8.1 feet, displacement 126 tons, 2 screws, horsepower 1.400 ihp, maximum trial speed 20 knots, 45 tons coal bunker capacity, crew numbering 24 men and an armament of 2-3pd revolvers and 3 torpedo tubes.

Source
Brassey’s Naval Annual for 1896. 

Russian torpedo boat 1st class Transund (1895) in 1896

Of the Baltic Fleet. Launched at Kolpiro in 1895, dimensions 127.9 x 15.6 x 6.9 feet, a displacement of 98 tons, 1 screw, horsepower 1.250 ihp, maximum trial speed 21 knots, coal bunker capacity 17 tons and an armamenet of 2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Brassey’s Naval Annual for 1896. 

Monday, 14 August 2017

Swiss container ship MSC Clara 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 13 August 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9708693, MMSI 374766000 and call sign 3FZW9. Built by Daewoo Shipbuilding&Marine Engineering, Geoje, South Korea in 2015. Owned and managed by MSC Mediterranean Shipping, Geneva, Switzerland. 

French container ship CMA CGM Laperouse 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 13 August 2017

France International Register-flagged, homeport Marseille, France, IMO 9454412, MMSI 228345700 and call sign FLTH. Built by Daewoo Shipbuilding&Marine Engineering, Geoje, South Korea in 2010. Owned and managed by CMA CGM, Marseille, France. 

Greek oil products tanker Proteas 2006-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 12 August 2017

Greece-flagged, homeport Athens, IMO 9305609, MMSI 240531000 and call sign SZXN. Owned and managed by Tsakos Columbia Shipmanagement, Athens, Greece. Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea in 2006. 

American oil products tanker Nord Integrity 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 12 August 2017

Singapore-flagged, IMO 9568031, MMSI 563030100 and call sign 9V5588. Owned by Fairfield Chemical carriers, Wilton, Connecticut, USA and managed by Norient Product Pool, Hellerup, Denmark. Earlier Panama-flagged with MMSI 355260000. Built by Iwagi Shipbuilding, Kamijima, Japan in 2010. 

Greek oil/chemical tanker Energy Progress 2008-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 August 2017

Isle of Man, United Kingdom-flagged, homeport Douglas, Isle of Man, IMO 9387279, MMSI 235062848 and call sign 2ATN7. Owned by Golden Energy Management and managed by Enterprise Shipping&Trading, both at Athens, Greece. Built by Sungdong Shipbuilding&Marine Engineering, Tongyoung, South Korea in 2008. 

The machinery of the British battleship HMS Colossus consisted of forward and backward turbines according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1910-1911 no. 7

Colossus-class

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau reporting that the British 22.500 ton battleship Colossus had a contracted speed of 21 miles. The 4 shafts were each fitted out with a forward and a backward turbine. The high pressure forward and back turbines were separated, the low pressure for- and backward turbines were housed in one casing. There were no longer cruising turbines available. To compensate this were at high speeds the steam just delivered in the last stages of the high pressure turbines, while with low speeds the steam was delivered through the whole high pressure turbines. The result of separating the turbines in fore and backward turbines was a higher power during manoeuvring.(1)

Note
1. Part of the Colossus-class consisting of the Colossus and the Hercules, preceded by the Neptune-class and succeeded by the Orion-class. Building ordered under the 1908 Naval Estimates. Laid down at the Scotts Shipbuilding, Greenock, Scotland on 8 July 1909, launched in 9 April 1910, trials started on 28 February 1911, commissioned on 8 August 1911, stricken in 1920, for disposal on 30 June 1921, boys’ training ship, training hulk since 23 July 1923, sold to the Charlestown Shipbreaking Industries in August 1928 and broken up at Charlestown, Scotland from 5 September 1928. 

French destroyer Cavalier launched at Le Havre, France according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1910-1911 no. 7

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht reporting the launching by Normand of the French destroyer Cavalier (1) just like her predecessor Chasseur (2) fitted out with 4 Normand boilers although only fuel oiled. The machinery consisted of Parsons turbines. It now became to possible to compare the differences between coal and oil fuelled boilers while it became clear that the Chasseur on her trip from Cherbourg, France towards Toulon, France had a very high coal consumption.

Notes
1. Of the Chasseur-class consisting of the Chasseur, Actée, Cavalier, Fantassin and the Janissaire, preceded by the Voltigeur-class and succeeded by the Bouclier-class, launched by Chantiers et Ateliers Augustin Normand, Le Havre, France on 9 May 1910, training ship since 1914 and stricken in December 1927.
2. Of the Chasseur-class consisting of the Chasseur, Actée, Cavalier, Fantassin and the Janissaire, preceded by the Voltigeur-class and succeeded by the Bouclier-class, launched by Chantiers et Ateliers Augustin Normand, Le Havre, France on  20 February 1909 and stricken in October 1919. 

French destroyer Tirailleur with success executing trials according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1910-1911 no. 7

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau reporting that the French destroyer Tirailleur achieved a maximum speed of 28,8 miles during her full speed trial. The contracted minimum speed was 28 miles.(1)

Note
1. Of the Voltigeur-class consisting of the Tirailleur and Voltigeur, preceded by the Spahi-class and succeeded by the Chasseur-class, laid down in 1906, launched by Forget et Chantiers de la Gironde, Bordeaux, France on 27 November 1908, completed in July 1910 and stricken in July 1921. 

French destroyer Fantassin executing with success trials according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1910-1911 no. 7

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau reporting that the French destroyer Fantassin achieved with oil fuelled boilers a speed of 29 miles during 6 hours.(1)

Note
1. Of the Chasseur-class consisting of the Chasseur, Actée, Cavalier, Fantassin and the Janissaire, preceded by the Voltigeur-class and succeeded by the Bouclier-class, launched by Forges et Chantiers de la Méditerranée, La Seyne-sur-Mer, France on 17 June 1909 and sunk after she collided with the French destroyer Mameluck on 5 June 1916. 

British light cruiser HMS Liverpool executing with success her trials according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1910-1911 no. 7

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau reporting the trial results of the British 4.800 tons scout cruiser Liverpool built by Vickers within 16 months. Fitted out with 4 screws, 4 shafts and parsons-turbines without cruising turbines. The medium speed during 6 runs over the measured mile was 26,171 miles against the expected 25 miles. At the 8 hours full speed was with a medium of 512,7 rpm 24.718 ehp and maximum 25.000hp a speed of 26,171 miles achieved with a coal consumption of 1,65 lbs/hour/ehp. At the 22 hours coal trial was with 426rpm, 13.970 ehp and a speed of 23,8 miles the coal consumption 1,57lbs/hour/ehp. After 20,75 hours was this trials temporarily stopped due to the mist. At the 8 hours coal trial was with 18.614ehp, 464 rpm and a speed of 25,102 miles the coal consumption 1,59lbs/hour.ehp.(1)

Note
1. Of the British-subclass Town-class light cruisers, laid down by Vickers Sons&Maxim Ltd., Barrow-in-Furness on 17 February 1909, launched on 30 October 1909, commissioned in October 1910 and sold via Stanlee to the Slough Trading Company to be broken up on 8 November 1921 which was executed in Germany. 

British light cruiser HMS Glasgow executing with success her trials according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1910-1911 no. 7

An item referred to the le Yacht reporting that the British scout cruiser Glasgow built by Fairfield developed at her 8 hours trial 22.500 hp achieving a speed of 24,9 mile. During 22 hours was with 14.055hp a speed of 23,7 miles achieved.(1)

Note
1. Of the British-subclass Town-class light cruisers, laid down by Fairfield Shipbuilding&Engineering, Govan, Scotland on 25 March 1909, launched on 30 September 1909, completed in September 1910, stokers’ training ship after 1918, decommissioned in 1922 and sold to Thos.W. Ward, Morecambe, United Kingdom to be broken up on 29 April 1927. 

Sunday, 13 August 2017

Dutch air-defence and command frigate Zr. Ms. Tromp (F803) 1999-


Het IJ, Amsterdam, Netherlands 19 August 2010

Of the De Zeven Provinciën-class with as sister ships Evertsen, Tromp and De Zeven Provinciën. Dimensions 144 x 18,8 x 5,1 metres and a maximum displacement of 6.044 ton. Maximum speed 28 knots. Her crew numbers 202 men. The armament consists of VL Standard Missile 2 Block IIIA against ships and air targets, 2-2cm Oerlikon, 1-12,7cm gun, 1/2-3mm Goalkeepers, MK 46 Mod 5 torpedoes, 8-Boeing RGM-84 Harpoon and VL Evolved Sea Sparrow Missiles. One NHI NH90 (M) helicopter. MMSI 244899000 and call sign PAET. Laid down by De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands on 3 September 1999, launched on 7 April 2001 and commissioned on 14 March 2003. 

Indonesian sailing naval training ship KRI Dewaruci 1932-


Het IJ, Amsterdam, Netherlands 19 August 2010

Barquentine. Building started by H.C. Stülcken Sohn, Steinwerder, Hamburg, Germany in 1932, building stopped when the Second World War broke out, heavily damaged was the building recontinued after the war, launched on 24 January 1953 and completed on 9 July 1953. Homeport Surabaya, Indonesia. To be decommissioned and will become a museum ship. Displacement 847 tons and as dimensions 58,3 x 9,5 x 4,05 x 36,5 (height) metres or 191 x 31 x 13.3 x 120 feet. Sail area 1.091 square metres/11.740 square feet. Crew numbers 81 persons and 7 cadets.  Speed 9 9sails)-10,5 (engine) knots. 

Norwegian sailing training ship Sørlandet 1927-


Het IJ, Amsterdam, Netherlands 19 August 2010

Norway-flagged, IMO 5334561, MMSI 257165000 and call sign LDTY3. Built by Høivolds Mek. Verksted, Kristiansund, Norway for O.A.T. Skjelbred in 1927. Gross tonnage 499 tons, net tonnage 149 tons, displacement 891 tons and as dimensions 57-64,15 (sparred) x 9 x 4,5 x 34,2 (height) metres. Speed 14 (engine)-17 (sails) knots. In the Second World War used by the German navy to accommodate submarine personnel. Used as training ship. 

Dutch sailing passenger ship Stad Amsterdam 1997-


Het IJ, Amsterdam, Netherlands 19 August 2010

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 918554, MMSI 246494000 and call sing PECA.
The concept idea was the Dutch merchant ship De Amsterdam dating from 1854. The base were 19th Century designs of clippers but modernized according to the needs of the20th Century. Designed by Gerard Dijkstra. Laid down at the Oranjewerf, Amsterdam, Netherlands in December 1997, hull completed in December 1998 and completed in 2000. Steel built 3-mast clipper. Dimensions 60,5 (deck)-76 (over all) x 10,5 x 4,8 x 46,25 (height) metres, displacement 110 tons, net tonnage 277 tons and a gross tonnage of 723 tons. Speed 11 (engine)-17 (sails) knots. Sail area maximum 2.200 square metres/ Crew numbered 30 persons with passenger accommodation for 68-115 persons. 

Austro-Hungarian navy ordered the building of torpedo boats according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 6

An item reported that Austro-Hungarian navy ordered the building of 16-250 ton torpedo boats at Fiume [nowadays Rijeka. Croatia].

Austro-Hungarian destroyer Tátra performed well during trials according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 6

An item reported that the Austro-Hungarian 800 ton destroyer Tatra achieved during the trials in August a speed of 33,25 miles which was more as the contracted minimum speed of 33,5 miles.(1)

Note
1. Of the Tátra-class built by Porto Rè {Kraljevica, Croatia], consisting of the Tátra, Balaton, Csepel, Lika, Triglav and Orjen. 

Slipways at La Spezia and Castellamare, Italy lengthened for building battleships according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 6

An item reported that at the same moment the slipways at La Spezia and Castellamare, Italy were lengthened to laying down the planned 30.000 ton battleships. The building of the battleships with building costs 85 million lires was to start on short notice just like the destroyers and scouts under the new programme. 

New kind of Italian submarine designed according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 6

An item reported that at Venice, Italy a new kind of submarine was tested especially for the navy designed by dr. Robiola.(1) She was such small that she could easily be carried by big ships. One men was enough to control her. By turning some sloping metal plates in the outer hull could she dive. It was possible to carry one torpedo fastened to the keel unlocked with releasing one pawl.

Note
1. Identical to Attillio Robiola who invented in those years aircraft?

Danish submarine Dykkeren fitted out with wireless radio station according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1911-1912 no. 3

An item reported that the Danish submarine Dykkeren was fitted out by a firm of Berlin, Germany with a wireless radio station. The tests were until then performed very well. The air network was connected to two 7 metres high masts, which masts could be folded on the deck. A range of 85 kilometres was guaranteed but it was possible to signal over a distance of 150 kilometres. Next were tests while she was submerged to be executed.(1)

Note
1. Launched by Fiat San Giorgio Shipyard, La Spezia, Italy on 18 July 1909, commissioned on 29 September 1909, sunk during an training on 9 October 1916, salvaged in 13 October 1916, decommissioned on 13 June 1917 and sold to be broken up.  

New French naval guns available according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1904-1905 no. 4

An item referred to the Mitteilungen aus dem Gebiete des Seewesens reporting that the French ships under construction were to be armed with new gun types of different calibre. Cal 50 with a increased start speed up to 925 metres/second. Thanks to the new more powerful gunpowder was the piercing capacity of a 27cm gun now equal to that of the existing 30,5cm and with the 24cm guns equal to the existing 27cm guns. 

French torpedo boats No.’s 171 and 196 collided according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1903-1904 no. 7

An item referred to the Mitteilungen reporting that the French torpedo boats No.’s 171 and 196 collided during the naval manoeuvres off Dunkirk, France. The No. 196 was as result leaking below the waterline at port side but could safely enter the harbour of Calais, France. 

Torpedo ships or cruisers 2nd class for the Austrian navy under 1885 budget according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1887-1888 no. 10

An item dealing with the Austrian naval budget for 1885 reported that at the British firm Armstrong a cruiser 2nd class or torpedo ship was under construction (1) and that approval was asked for a second ship of this kind.(2) A torpedo ship needed a huge maximum speed which asked for engines delivering much power despite the relative small weight of the engines. To be assured of a good outcome were ship and engines to be delivered by one firm which all ready had much experience in this topic. This torpedo ship or cruiser was to serve as a model for the navy and the home industry.

There were several reasons to ask for a budget to built a second torpedo ship. To operate successful were torpedo boats divided over flotillas. Each such flotilla needed one or two torpedo ships to act as éclaireurs [reconnaissance scouts], to protect their own torpedo boats against torpedo boats of the enemy, to hunt for destroyers of the enemy, to act as scout and to serve as connection centre between the flotillas. If necessary were the torpedo ships to hand over their own torpedoes, water, coal and crewmembers and get new stores from the torpedo boat depot ships anchored in safe harbours. To execute these tasks was a speed of 18-19 miles needed, seagoing qualities and a coal bunker capacity sufficient to stay for a considerable time at sea. The armament was to consist of 2 small guns, torpedo launchers, a ram bow and a large number of machineguns. Estimated building costs 1 million florines. The ship was to be built as soon as possible to add it in begin 1886 to the fleet.

Notes
1. Of the Panther-class consisting of the Panther and Leopard, preceded by the Zara-class and succeeded by the SMS Tiger. Torpedo ship similar to a torpedo cruisers, in 1903 reclassified as 3rd class cruisers and since 1909 called small cruisers. Laid down by Armstrong, Elswick on 29 October 1884, launched on 13 June 1885, completed on 31 December 1885 and broken up in 1920.
2. Of the Panther-class consisting of the Panther and Leopard, preceded by the Zara-class and succeeded by the SMS Tiger. Torpedo ship similar to a torpedo cruisers, in 1903 reclassified as 3rd class cruisers and since 1909 called small cruisers. Laid down by Armstrong, Elswick in January 1885, launched on 10 September 1885, completed on 31 March 1886 and broken up in 1920. 

Saturday, 12 August 2017

Russian (ex-Magdalene Vinnen III 1921-1936, Kommodore Johnsen 1936-1945) 4 mast bark Sedov 1945-


Het IJ, Amsterdam, Netherlands 19 August 2010

Russia-flagged, IMO 7946356, MMSI 273510000 and call sign UELO. Launched as the Magdalene Vinnen III at the Krupp Germaniawerft, Kiel, Germany for account of F.A. Vinnen, Bremen, Germany. Maiden voyage started on 1 September 1921 loaded with coal fro, Cardiff, United Kingdom towards Buenos Aires, Argentina. Very active transporting saltpetre from Chile and grain from Australia back towards Germany. Sold to the Norddeutscher Lloyd and renamed Kommodore Johnsen as cargo annex training ship. Returned on 11 Augustus 1939 in Germany and laid up during the war. Handed over to the Soviet Union as war reparations, first serving in the navy and since as training ship for the merchant shipping for the department of fishery and in 1991 handed over to the Technical University of Murmansk. Crew numbered as a cargo ship around 30 men while as a training ship 55-56 persons, maximum cadets and 44 paying passengers. Gross tonnage 3.556 tons, net tonnage 3.017 tons, displacement 6.148 tons, cargo capacity 5.340 tons and as dimensions 117,5 (over all) x 14,6 x 6,5 x 58 (height masts above the water level) metres. Sail area 4.195 square metres. Auxiliary 1.150 hp diesel. Speed while under sails more as 18 knots. 

Polish tall ship Dar Mlodziezy 1981-


Het IJ, Amsterdam, Netherlands 19 August 2010

Poland-flagged, homeport Gdynia, IMO 7821075, MMSI 261148000 and call sign SQLZ. Launched at the Gdansk Shipyard with yard number 59/1 in November 1981, commissioned on 4 July 1982. With a displacement of 2.946 tons and as dimensions 79,4 (between perpendiculars)-108,8 (over all) x 12 x 62,1 (height) x  6,3 (depth) metres or 260-357 x 39 x 21 x 204 feet. Sail area 3.015 square metres and a 2x760hp diesel engines and 2 screws. Speed 12 (engines)-16 (sail) knots. Range maximum 264,7 nautical miles. Crew total 176 persons consisting of 40 crew and 136 cadets. Designed by Zygmunt Choren. Replaced the Dar Pomorza. 

Dutch diving vessel Zr. Ms. Nautilus (A853) 1992-



Gorinchem, Netherlands 9 May 2009

Of the Cerberus-class built at the Scheepswerf Visser, Den Helder, Netherlands. Commissioned on 18 August 1992. Maximum displacement 297 ton and as dimensions 37,8 x 8,7 metres. Lengthened in 2008 with 10,5 metres and modernized at the same time. Crew numbers 6 men. IMO 9021758, MMSI 245989000 and call sign PAYO. 

Dutch navy coastal tug Zr. Ms. Linge (A874) 1986-decommissioned



Gorinchem, Netherlands 9 May 2009

Linge (A874), IMO 8613205, MMSI 244981000 and call sign PAIU. Laid down by scheepswerf Bijlsma B.V. Wartena, Netherlands with yard number 812 on 12 June 1986, launched on 15 November 1986, casco completed by Delta Shipyard, Sliedrecht, Netherlands and commissioned on 20 February 1987. Gross tonnage 235 tons, maximum displacement 380 tons and as dimensions 27,45 x 8,3 x 2,7metres. Bollard pull 22 ton. With a crew of 5 men. Speed 5 knots. Of the Linge-class consisting of the Linge, Regge, Hunze, Rotte and Gouwe. 

Dutch sailing yacht Ecolution 2007-

Den Helder, Netherlands 23 May 2017

Netherlands-flagged, MMSI 244780281 and call sign PA3065. Laid down in 2007 at Groningen, Netherlands and launched in July 2010. Designed by Gerard Dijkstra. Owned by Ecolution b.v. 

Spanish galley Nuestra Señora de Monserrate 1529

Part of the galleys fitted out at Barcelona to transport the emperor towards Italy in 1529. Captain D. Miguel Domingo.

Source
C. Fernandez Duro. Armada española desde la unión de los reinos de Catilla y de Leon, vol. 1, 1895, p. 369.

Spanish galley Santa Ulalia y San Telmo 1529

Part of the galleys fitted out at Barcelona to transport the emperor towards Italy in 1529. Captain D. Luis de Icart.

Source
C. Fernandez Duro. Armada española desde la unión de los reinos de Catilla y de Leon, vol. 1, 1895, p. 369

Portuguese gunboat Ave sent to Dahomey according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 4 September 1883

An item reported that the king of Dahomey (1) believing that Portugal intended to hand over part of the coast to England immediately ordered to imprison the Portuguese commanding officer and the soldiers of Whydah fortress.(2) Vice admiral Teixeira da Silva (3), governor of St. Thome (4) sent the gunboat Ave (5) to make clear that the rumours were false and the military were released.

Notes
1. Kingdom of Dahomey to be located in Benin, in 1894 annexed by France after king Behanzin lost the war and becoming a French protectorate 1894-1904, then part of French Dahomey nowadays known as the Republic of Benin.
2. The fort of São João  de Ajudá {nowadays known as Ouidah, Atlantic coast of Benin], under Portuguese control until 1961.
3. Francisco Teixeira da Silva (1826 Lisbon, Portugal-26 April 1894 Beira, Mozambique), governor 26 January 1882-24 May 1884.
.4 Nowadays the Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Principe located in the Gulf of Guinea.
5. Or Rio Ave, built by Arsenal de Marinha, Lisbon, Portugal in 1879, converted into a light ship in Portuguese Guinea [now Guinea-Bissau], laid up in 1899 and still existing in 1901. 

French and Portuguese gunboats active at Noqui, Angola according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant dated 16 March 1884

An item reported the outbreak at Nokki [[Noqui, Angola] of hostilities between French, Dutch and Portuguese merchants and the natives at the factories. The French gunboat Sagittaire (1)and two Portuguese gunboats participated in the fights. The merchants fitted out an expedition against the natives but which was defeated with as result that the natives attacked and besieged the factories. The merchants forced to ask the international Congo-expedition for help.

Note
1. Of the Crocodile class of composite gunboats, launched in 1881 at Normand, Le Havre, France in 1881, completed in 1881 and stricken in 1896. 

French gunboat Sagittaire sent to the Congo according to the Dutch newspaper Rotterdamsch nieuwsblad dated 21 November 1882

An item dated Paris, France 19th referred to the French newspaper la Patrie and La Liberte reporting that the French gunboat Sagittaire (1) would be sent to the Congo and steamed up the river to sanction the treaty with Makoka.(2)

Notes
1 Of the Crocodile class of composite gunboats, launched in 1881 at Normand, Le Havre, France in 1881, completed in 1881 and stricken in 1896.
2. Illoh Makoko, king of the Batekes, ruler of the centre of the Republic of Congo, Gabon and partly the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The treaty was signed with the Italian-born French explorer Pietro Paolo Savorgnan di Brazza (26 January 1852-14 September 1905). The treaty led to what became French Congo (1891-1906). 

British screw steam gunboat HMS Thrush protecting British consulate at Lourenço Marques, Mozambique according to the Dutch newspaper Haagsche courant dated 27 September 1894

An item referred to tidings received from Lourenzo Marquez (1) reporting that the tension increased because of the aggressive attitude of the natives. The Portuguese troops were called back to the town and the streets were barricaded, the British gunboat Thrush (2) disembarked a detachment marines to protect the British consulate.

Notes
1. Maputo, earlier known as Lourenço Marques, capital city of Mozambique.
2. Composite screw steam gunboat of the Redbreast-class, launched by Scotts, Greenock, United Kingdom on 22 June 1889 and finally wrecked on 11 April 1917. 

French gunboat Sagittaire transporting missionaries and cleric labourers towards Stanley Pool, Congo according to the Dutch newspaper De Tijd dated 19 October 1883

An item dated Loanda [Angola] dated 17th October reported the arrival of Sir Frederik Goldsmith (1) on the 3rd at the Congo and who immediately went to the Upper Congo. The French gunboats Sagittaire (2) departed on 10th September with 3 French missionaries and some cleric labourers towards Bona to found at Stanley Pool (3) a mission.

Notes
1. Sir Frederic John Goldsmif (18 May 1818 Milan, Italy-12 January 1908 Hammersmith, England), served in the British Army and in the East India Company. Sent by the Belgian crown to the Congo to estimate the value of the treaties with the chief of the Congo Basin. He was forced to return to England because of his worse health.
2. Of the Crocodile class of composite gunboats, launched in 1881 at Normand, Le Havre, France in 1881, completed in 1881 and stricken in 1896.
3. Nowadays Pool Malebo also known as Lake Nkunda in the lower reaches of the Congo River, with the opposite shores the capital cities of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Republic of Congo. 

Chinese government excuses for firing at British gunboat HMS Zephyr according to the Dutch newspaper Rotterdamsch nieuwsblad dated 22 September 1884

An item reported that the Chinese cabinet sent the British ambassador at Tientsin official apologies for the that the fortress at Kimpai fired at the British gunboat Zephyr.(1)

Note
1. Composite built screw steam gunboat, launched in 1873, sold to be converted into a salvage vessel and finally broken up in 1939. 

French gunboat Sagittaire occupying Ponta Negra and Loango, Congo according to the Dutch newspaper De Amsterdammer dated 9 May 1883

An item dated Oporto, Portugal 8th May referred to the Journal do Commercio where a letter received from Congo dated 30th March was published confirming that French forces occupied Ponta Negra and Loango [Republic of Congo]. Without showing a flag and using another name arrived the French gunboat Sagittaire (1) and disembarked troops. A few days handed the commanding officer of the Portuguese gunboat Bengo (2) and Portuguese merchants at Ponta Negra an official protest over to the commanding officer of the Sagittaire.

Notes
1 Of the Crocodile class of composite gunboats, launched in 1881 at Normand, Le Havre, France in 1881, completed in 1881 and stricken in 1896.
2. Launched at Laird, Birkenhead, United Kingdom on 23 August 1879, completed in 1879 and stricken in 1905. 

Portuguese gunboat Tejo protecting Europeans at Noqui, Angola according to the Dutch newspaper Haagsche courant dated 26 March 1884

An item dated Lisbon, Portugal 24 March reported that again riots broke out at Nokki along the Congo-river and that the Portuguese gunboat Tejo(1) left Loanda, Angola towards Nokki [Noqui, Angola] to protect European citizens.

Note
1. Launched at the Arsenalda Marinha, Lisbon, Portugal in 1869, completed in 1869 and stricken in 1900. Wood-built. Modernized in the 1880’s. 

Friday, 11 August 2017

Chinese heavy load carrier Xiang Yun Kou 2011-



Outer harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 August 2017

China-flagged, homeport Guangzhou, China, IMO 9483097, MMSI 413055620 and call sign BQCW. Owned and managed by Cosco, Guangzhou, China. Built by Guangzhou International Shipyard, Guangzhou, China in 2011. 

Dutch propelled floating sheerleg (ex-Sudopodyom 2 1973, Sudopodjom2 1973-1999, Magnus 1999-2000) Cormorant 2000-


Outer harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 August 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Terneuzen. Call sign PCHJ, IMO 7328073 and MMSI 245884000. Ex-Sudopodyom 2 renamed 1973, Sudopodjom2 renamed 21 December 1999 and Magnus renamed 2000. Gross tonnage 1.505 tons, net tonnage 451 tons, summer deadweight 1.675 tons and as dimensions 54,00 x 23,96 x 2,70 (minimum)-3,68 (maximum) x 8,75 minimum airdraft)-66,00 (maximum air draft) metres. Bucket grab capacity 50 cubic metres, wreck grab capacity 300 tons, lifting capacity 2x300 tons main tackle, 2x100 tons top tackle or flying JIB, 2x200 tons deck tacle and 2x5 tons auxiliary tackle. Built in 1973 by HDW Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. Owned by Multra Power Lift and managed by Multraship Towage&Salvage, both of Terneuzen, Netherlands. 

Dutch tug (ex-C 31 1944, Zeezwaluw 1946-1952, Elis 1952-1952, Sub-Lieutenant Valcke 1952-1982, Elis 1982-1985, Linge 1985-1990, Elis 1990, Ijzeren Vrijer 199-) Ellis

Harbour Rotterdam, Netherlands 9 August 2017

ENI 3020652 and 2508781. Built by De Vries Lentsch, Alphen a/d Rijn, Netherlands and completed by Holland-Nautic Scheepswerf v/h Machinefabriek NV, Haarlem, Netherlands with yard number 2147 in 1944. Dimensions 28,95 x 6,04 x 3,05 metres. According to www.binnenvaart.eu broken up! Owned as Elis by Holland Bergingswerken NV, Haarlem in 1952, by Overseas Trading Company, Antwerpen, Belgium since 1952, renamed Valcke (A950) of the Belgian navy since 1952, since 1982 of R. Heise Scheepshandelaar BV, Zaandam, Netherlands. As Elis since A.L. Carmigge;t, Woudrichem, Netherlands since 1989, since 1990 of P.A. Kleijn, Nieuwe-Beijerland and since as Ijzeren Vrijer of H.M.W. Leusink&R. van het Kaar, Phoenix, USA. According to www.marhisdata.nl dimensions 24,74 (between perpendiculars)-27,15 (over all) x 6,00 (registered) x 2,56 (registered) x 3,15 (registered depth) metres. Laid down as the German minelayer C 31 of the Sperrversuch-Kommando but now completed, casco was bought by Holland-Nautic Scheepswerf v/h Machinefabriek NV, Haarlem, Netherlands with yard number 2147, commissioned as the Dutch pilot boat Zeezwaluw on 31 August 1946, in 1951 as Elis of the N.V. Holland, Maatschappij tot Uitvoering van Scheepstransporten en Bergingswerken, Haarlem, Netherlands, since 20 October 1952 as the Belgian navy tug Sub-Lieutenant (A_950) homeport Ostend, Belgium, stationed at Banana, Congo, returned in 1960, laid up at Zeebrugge, Belgium in 1980, sold to Handelsonderneming Helse Roelof, Zaandam, Netherlands since 15 June 1982, sold to A.L. Carmiggelt, Woudrich and renamed Line as inland vessel on 24 January 1985, sold to Pieter Antonius Kleijn, Nieuwe-Beijerland and renamed Elis on 22 May 1990, sold to H.M.W. Leusink&R. van het Kaar, Phoenix, USA and renamed Ijzeren Vrijer on 24 September 1990 and nowadays again Elis. 

Dutch screw steamship 4th class Bandjermassin heavily damaged by termites according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1886-1887 no. 9

An item dated Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 28 September 1886 reported that the Bandjermasin recently placed on the slipway for a new boarding were termites discovered outside the copper near the prow. After an examination became clear that the prow and the wood connection with the keel were seriously corroded.(1)

Note
1. Bandjermassin, ex-Bandhermassing renamed 1880, screw steamship 4th class, call sign GQCT, composite-built and coppered, on stocks at the shipyard of the Kon. Fabriek van stoom- en andere werktuigen, Amsterdam, Netherlands in July 1873, launched on 7 April 1874, commissioned on 16 June 1874, dimensions 42-45 (over all) x 8,8 x 3,6 metres, a displacement of 730 tons, horsepower 90 hp/400 ehp, speed 9,5 miles, an armament of 3 guns (1879: 1 rifled 18cm gun, 2-12cm guns) and a crew numbering 80 men (1879). Decommissioned on 1 September 1894, stricken, condemned and sold for ƒ 10.000. 

Dutch paddle steamship Zr. Ms. Salak to be recommissioned according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1886-1887 no. 9

An item dated Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 28 September 1886 reported that the Salak was fitted out with a new boiler and to be commissioned again. Her armament was changed into 1-12cm K.A. nr. 1 mounted on a lifted platform above the bow and  1-7,5cm gun mounted on the aft ship both able to fire straight ahead, needed while she served the most of her time on the rivers in the archipelago. Further more had she 2-12cm K.A. no. 1 on the half deck for broadside fire.(1)

Note
1. Paddle steamship 4th class, call sign GQTD, iron-built, built for the Department of Colonies, launched at the shipyard of Ned. Stoomboot Mij., Fijenoord, Netherlands with yard number 85 in 1874, assembled at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies, commissioned on 26/27 December 1877, repaired in 1886, arrival at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies on 23 May 1889, after examination concluded not worth the be repaired, condemned, decommissioned on 13 July 1889, sold with engine and boilers at 10.00 o’clock on 14 September 1889, armament 3 (original: 1 rifled 16cm, 2-13cm guns)-4 (1886: 3-12cm guns, 1-7,5cm gun) guns and a crew numbering 59-69 (47 Europeans, 22 natives). 

Negro organisations in the USA asked for an own battleship according to the Dutch newspaper De Sumatra Post dated 16 March 1938

An item reported that several negro organisations in the USA asked the US cabinet to approve that one battleship was to be complete manned with negroes. The organisations pointed out that there were 12 million negroes in the USA and while it was allowed that white men and negroes served together, it no more as reasonable was that negroes got their ‘own battleship’. 

Spanish galley Asunción de la Virgen 1529

Part of the galleys fitted out at Barcelona to transport the emperor towards Italy in 1529. Captain D. Pedro de Robles.

Source
C. Fernandez Duro. Armada española desde la unión de los reinos de Catilla y de Leon, vol. 1, 1895, p. 369. 

Spanish galley Nuestra Señora de la Piedad 1529

Part of the galleys fitted out at Barcelona to transport the emperor towards Italy in 1529. Captain D. Juan Angel Despuig.

Source
C. Fernandez Duro. Armada española desde la unión de los reinos de Catilla y de Leon, vol. 1, 1895, p. 369.

Spanish galley Santa Ana 1529

Part of the galleys fitted out at Barcelona to transport the emperor towards Italy in 1529. Captain D. Francisco de Rebolledo.

Source
C. Fernandez Duro. Armada española desde la unión de los reinos de Catilla y de Leon, vol. 1, 1895, p. 369. 

Spanish galley San Antonio de Padua 1529

Part of the galleys fitted out at Barcelona to transport the emperor towards Italy in 1529. Captain D. Jaime Fivaller.

Source
C. Fernandez Duro. Armada española desde la unión de los reinos de Catilla y de Leon, vol. 1, 1895, p. 369. 

Spanish galley Santa Tecla 1529

Part of the galleys fitted out at Barcelona to transport the emperor towards Italy in 1529. Captain D. Domingo de Mendoza.

Source
C. Fernandez Duro. Armada española desde la unión de los reinos de Catilla y de Leon, vol. 1, 1895, p. 369. 

Spanish galley San Martin 1529

Part of the galleys fitted out at Barcelona to transport the emperor towards Italy in 1529. Captain D. Luis de Lara.

Source
C. Fernandez Duro. Armada española desde la unión de los reinos de Catilla y de Leon, vol. 1, 1895, p. 369. 

Russian torpedo boat 1st class Rochensalm (1890) in 1896

Of the Baltic Fleet. Launched at Putiloff, St. Petersburg, Russia in 1890. Dimensions 136.5 x 13 x 7.8 feet, displacement 81 tons, horsepower 1.100 ihp, maximum trial speed 21 knots and coal bunker capacity 30 tons.

Source
Brassey’s Naval Annual for 1896. 

Russian torpedo boat 1st class Seskar (1891) in 1896

Of the Baltic Fleet. Launched at Kolpiro in 1891, dimensions 152 x 13 x8.3 feet, displacement 100 tons, horsepower 1.000 ihp and maximum trail speed 19 knots.

Source
Brassey’s Naval Annual for 1896. 

Russian torpedo boat 1st class Sweaborg (1886) in 1896

Of the Baltic Fleet. Launched at Normand, France in 1886, displacement 152.3 x 12.3 x 8.1 feet, displacement 96 tons, 1 screw, horsepower 780ihp, maximum trial speed 19.7 knots, coal bunker capacity 30 tons, crew numbering 21 men and an armament consisting of 2 quick firing guns.

Source
Brassey’s Naval Annual for 1896. 

Russian torpedo boat 1st class Sestoresk (1893) in 1896

Of the Baltic Fleet. Launched at Normand, France in 1893, dimensions 118 x 13.2 x 8,7 feet, displacement 130 tons, 2 screws, horsepower 1.900 ihp, maximum trial speed 25 knots, coal bunker capacity 10 tons, crew numbered 21 men and an armament consisting of 2-1p d guns and 2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Brassey’s Naval Annual for 1896. 

Russian torpedo boat 1st class Revel (1886) in 1896

Of the Baltic Fleet. Launched at Normand, France in 1886, dimensions 152.3 x 12.3 x 8.1 feet, displacement 96 tons, 1 screw, horsepower 780 ihp, maximum trials peed 22 knots, coal bunker capacity 30 tons, crew numbered 23 men and an armament consisting of 2 quick firing guns and 2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Brassey’s Naval Annual for 1896.

Russian torpedo boat 1st class Pernoff (1892) in 1896

Of the Baltic Fleet. Launched at Normand, France in 1892, dimensions 138 x 14.7 x 9.9 feet, displacement 118 tons, 1 screw, maximum trial speed 25.4 knots, crew numbered 26 men and an armament consisting of 3 machineguns and 2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Brassey’s Naval Annual for 1896. 

Russian torpedo boat 1st class Narwa (1886) in 1896

Of the Baltic Fleet. Launched at Elbing, Germany in 1886, dimensions 128 x 15.7 x 7,5 feet, tonnage 87 tons, 1 screw, horsepower 900 ihp, maximum trial speed 20 knots, coal bunker capacity 17 tons, crew numbered 13 men and armament consisting of 4-1pd revolvers and 2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Brassey’s Naval Annual for 1896. 

Thursday, 10 August 2017

American Electric Boat Company submarine design Type 105-A dated 2 April 1914

Copyright Archive Municipality Archive Vlissingen 413.40/FA11887

The Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde at Vlissingen, Netherlands built several submarines using E.B.C. designs. In November 1914 was the contract with the Royal Netherlands Navy signed for building the submarine K III to serve in the Dutch East Indies. For this destination she was of larger dimensions than the O submarines which served in the European coastal waters. She was ordered on 24 July 1914m laid down with yard number 161 on 15 July 1915 in the shed on the North bank, launched on 12 August 1919 and handed over t the Royal Netherlands Navy on 4 September 1920. Dimensions 64,08 (over all) x 5,426 x 4,856 (hold) and a displacement of 582,6 (surfaced)-720 (submerge) tons. Diving depth 40 metres. Armament 2-45cm stern torpedo tubes, 2-24cm torpedo tubes in the superstructure and 2-45 next to each other 45cm bow tubes, 1-7,5cm gun and 1 machineguns. She could carry 12 torpedoes with her. Radius with a speed of 11 knots was 3.500 nautical miles and submerged with 8,5 knots 25 miles. Speed 16,5 (surfaced)-9,2 (submerged) knots. The shipyard corresponded with the E.B.C. about the original design.

Dimensions 63,72 (over all) x 5,56 (maximum over fenders) x 5,54 (depth bottom keel-top superstructure deck) x 3,40 (surface to bottom of keel) x 2,24 (surface freeboard to superstructure deck)-3,44 (surface freeboard to upper deck station) metres, displacement of 544,1 (surfaced)-697,5 (submerged excluded non-watertight parts)-782,0 (included non-watertight parts) tons. Net buoyancy 153,4, 28,2% of surface displacement and 22,0% of submerged displacement and buoyancy including 65% of the superstructure is 29,9% of the submerged displacement. Total weight of ballast and fuel that can be blown/pumped at 40 metres 198 tons, or 28,4% (of submerged displacement)-36,4% (of surfaced displacement). Range of stability 140 (surfaced)-180 (submerged) degree. Metacentric height 40cm (surface)-26cm (submerged, guaranteed) centimetres.

Guaranteed surfaced speed using the main engines was 17 (changed with a pencil in 17,5) knots.
Surface radius with a speed of 17 knots on base of the internal fuel tanks was 1.850 nautical miles (changed with a pencil in 1.600), with a speed of 11 knots with the use of one engine on base of the internal fuel tanks guaranteed 3.500 nautical miles and with a speed of 11 knots with the use of 1 engine and maximum fuel bunker capacity 5.400 nautical miles. Horsepower of one engine with a speed of 12 knots was 560 shp.

Guaranteed submerged speed during 3 hours was 8,5 knots, during 1½ hours 11 knots. Design speed during 1 hour was 11 knots (crossed with a pencil). Economical submerged speed was 5 knots and the corresponding design radius 85 nautical miles.
Machinery consisted of 2 oil fuelled engines each of 400hp, 2 main electric motors each of 315hp during 1½ hours and 2 main electric motors for continuous use of each 210hp.

Diving test depth 45 metres (changed by pencil into 40).

Armament consisted of 4 internal bow torpedo tubes and if desired 2 internal in the stern and 1x2 on deck for which 8 torpedoes were carried to be increased if desired with 2-4 torpedoes.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1970 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen, Netherlands) Inventory number 214.802

Finnish tug Zeus 1995-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 August 2017

Finland-flagged, homeport Helsinki, IMO 9130729, MMSI 230339000 and call sign OJHB. Gross tonnage 1.102 tons, gross tonnage 545 tons and as dimensions 45 x 14 x 7,5 metres. In 1995 built at the shipyard of Simek, Flekkefjord, Norway. Owned and managed by Alfons Hakans, Turku, Finland. Cyprus-flagged, homeport Limassol, Cyprus, MMSI 212409000 and call sign 5BSP4. Renamed Zeus of Finland? 

Japanese container ship (APL Ningbo 2010) Seroja Empat 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 6 August 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9495040, MMSI 356575000 and call sign 3FOE7. Ex-APL Ningbo renamed May 2014. Owned and managed by Nissen Kaiun, Imabari, Japan. Built by MHI Nagasaki Shipyard&Engine Works, Nagasaki, Japan in 2010. 

Greek bulk carrier Rinia 2012-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 5 August 2017

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9594406, MMSI 256308000 and call sign 9HA2839. Owned by Solidtrans and managed by Sea Traders, Athens, Greece. Built by Cosco Guangdong Shipyard, Donnguan, China in 2012. 

Dutch tug (ex-Avant III 1915-1954, Risico 1954-1956, Mutatio II 1956-1964, Maja 1964, Levant 1964-1969, Albatros 1969-1970) 1970-

Inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 10 August 2017

ENI 02101958. Dimensions 20,05 x 4,64 x 1,78 metres. Originally fitted out with a 150hp steam engine replaced by a 455hp Detroit 16-V-71 engine. Ex-Avant III 1915-1954, Risico 1954-1956, Mutatio II 1956-1964, Maja 1964, Levant 1964-1969, Albatros 1969-1970. Anno 2017 owned by V.O.F. Passmann, Peulen. Built as the En Avant III by Gebr. Kooiman, Zwijndrecht, Netherlands for account of N.V. Sleepmaatschappij En Avant III, Puttershoek, Netherlands. 

Peruvian training ship BAP Unión 2010-




Dutch signal gun Oost no. 11 v/4cm no. 1

Rotterdam harbour, Netherlands 10 August 2017

Barque rigged sailing steel built 4- mast training ship. Building of such a ship was decided by law in 1985, lacking financial funds the building was delayed until she was ordered on 23 December 2010, laid down by Shipyard Marine Industrial Services (SIMA), Callao, Peru on 8 December 2010, launched on 22 December 2012 and commissioned on 27 January 2016. MMSI 760105000 and call sign OBAA. Dimensions 115,0 (over all included bowsprit) x 13,50 x 6,50 x 53,50 (air draft) metres or 378.11 x 44.3 x 21.4 x 175.6 feet and a displacement of 3.200 tons. Sail area 3.420 square metres/36.620 square feet. Fitted out with a Caterpillar 3516J engine. Speed 12 knots. Crew numbered 250 persons (included trainees). The bronze figurehead symbolizes the Inca culture of Peru and was made by Pilar Martinez Woodman. The main figure is that of the emperor or Sapa Inca Tupac Ypangui.