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Tuesday, 26 September 2017

The condition of the Dutch paddle steamship Zr.Ms. Admiraal van Kinsbergen as described in a letter to the editor published in the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 17 April 1873


In a letter published in this newspaper an anonymous  Dutch navy officer described the miserable condition of the Dutch warships serving at that moment in the Dutch East Indies. He was quite cynical in his comment dealing with the condition of the ships ending with the phrase Happy Indies! Happy Navy! Poor Netherlands!

The Zr.Ms. Admiraal van Kinsbergen was probably still in good condition while there were no remarks made.(1)

Note
1. Paddle steamship 4th class, call sign GQBN, built at the shipyard of the Nederlandsche Stoomboot Maatschappij at Rotterdam, Netherlands but apparently disassembled and assembled at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies in 1853-1854, commissioned on 7 May 1853, docked at Bandjermassing, Dutch East Indies 21 August-15 September 1877, decommissioned 25 December 1877 at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies, condemned, displacement 293 tons and as dimensions 45,72 x 6,50-12,40 (over side wheels) x 1,70 metres, horsepower 70 hp, armament one 30 pd gun and a crew numbering 43 men (1877). 

American clipper Antelope arrived in California coming from New York, USA according to the American newspaper Sacramento Daily Union dated 26 July 1853

An item dated 23rd reported the arrival of the clipper Antelope master Shinn coming in 115 days from New York, USA with a cargo for Crosby&Dibblee. 

American clipper Lantao arrived in California coming from New York, USA according to the American newspaper Sacramento Daily Union dated 26 July 1853

An item dated 23rd reported the arrival of the clipper Lantao master Bradbury coming in 121 days from New York, USA with a cargo for Macondray&Co. 

American clipper Wings of the Morning arrived in California coming from New York, USA according to the American newspaper Sacramento Daily Union dated 26 July 1853

An item dated 23rd reported the arrival of the clipper Wings of the Morning master Lovell arrived after a voyage of 180 days coming from New York and via Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 109 days with a cargo for Hussey, Bondhale. 

American clipper Queen of Clippers arrived in California coming from New York, USA according to the American newspaper Sacramento Daily Union dated 29 October 1853

An item dated Tuesday 27th reported the arrival of the clipper Queen of Clippers master Zerega coming in 113 days fro, New York, USA. 

German general cargo ship (ex-Cito 2005-2007, Ems 2007-2015, Wilson Vivero 2015-2016, Vivero 2016) Longfjell 2016-


Kieler Canal , Germany September 2017

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, homeport Saint John’s, IMO 9268863, MMSI 305162000 and call sign V2DB7. Ex-Cito renamed on 26 November 2007, Ems renamed 26 August 2015 Wilson Vivero in September 2016 and Vivero in October 2016. As Ems owned and managed by Eilbrecht Reederei, Emden, Germany. Launched by Peters Shipyard, Kampen, Netherlands on 8 April 2005 and delivered on 1 June 2005. As Cito owned by C.V. Scheepvaartonderneming Cito B.V./Cor and Kitty Switynk, Harlingen, Netherlands, managed by Wagenborg Shipping B.V., Delfzijl, Netherlands and call sign PHCY. As Wilson Vivero, Vivero and Longfjell owned and managed by HS Schiffahrts G.m.b.H.&Co., Haren/Ems, Germany. 

Chinese car carrier Freedom Ace 2005-

Kieler Canal, Germany September 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9293662, MMSI 352801000 and call sign H9BS. Owned and managed by New Asian Shipping, Hong Kong, China. Built by MHI Kobe Shipyard&Machinery Works, Kobe, Japan in 2005. 

Norwegian general cargo ship (ex-Hiddensee 1993-1997, Sea Fortune 1997, Hiddensee 1997, Seafortune 1997-1998, MCL Fortune 1998-May 2004, Dutch Spear 2004-2005) Wilson Gijon 2005-


Kieler Canal, Germany September 2017

Barbados-flagged, homeport Bridgetown, IMO 9056038, MMSI 314194000 and call sign 8PSC. Built by Slovenske Lodenice, Komarno, Slovakia in 1993. Owed byCaiano Shipping,Haugesund, Norway and managed by Wilson Shipmanagement, Bergen, Norway. Ex-Hiddensee renamed January 1997, Sea Fortune renamed 29 August 1997, Hiddensee renamed 29 August 1997, Seafortune renamed November 1998, MCL Fortune renamed May 2004 and Dutch Spear renamed April 2005. 

Dutch patrol vessel R.P. 138 at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Condition of the hull good and of the 3 Gray diesels reasonable. Armament consisted of 2-7,7mm machineguns. Around 15 August available.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 196, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch patrol vessel R.P. 145 at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Condition of the hull and the Japanese diesel was good. Armament consisted of 1-12,7mm and 2-7,7mm machineguns. Ready for service.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 196, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch patrol vessel R.P. 144 at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

The condition of the hull was good, of the 2 Packard Marine Engines reasonable. Armament consisted of 2-2cm and 2-12,7mm machineguns. On 18 August available.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 196, National Archive, The Hague.

Dutch patrol vessel R.P. 143 at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

The condition of the hull was good of the Japanese diesel engine reasonable. Unarmed. Laid up.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 196, National Archive, The Hague.

Dutch patrol vessel R.P. 131 at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Condition of the hull and the 2 Buda diesel engines was good. Armament consisted of 1-2cm, 1-2,7mm and 2-7,7mm machineguns. Ready for service.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 196, National Archive, The Hague.

The dry docks at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

The 3.000 tons of the naval establishment was available for ships with a length of 100 metres and maximum 2.500 tons.
The 2.500 tons of the naval establishment was available for ships with a length of 100 metres and maximum 2.000 tons.
The submarine dock East was in good condition, length 80 metres, width 8 metres, draught 5 metres and mast height above water 17,5 metres.
The submarine dock West could not be used an was being repaired, length 80 metres, width 8 metres, draught 5 metres and mast height above water 17,5 metres.
The 15.000 tons was floating again but was nog being examined which would take a lot of time. Before it could be used again it needed to be docked itself. For this purpose was a dock to be excavate or it became possible to dock it at Singapore, Pearl Harbour, USA or in Australia.
The 3.500 tons dock of the Soerabaia Dok Maatschappij was available for docking ships with a maximum of 2.000 tons.
There were 2 aircraft docks with a lifting capacity of respectively 35 and 40 tons, but which were not tested at the moment
The 3 excavated docks of the dredging department were being repaired.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 196, National Archive, The Hague.

Monday, 25 September 2017

Dutch general cargo ship (ex-Nora 2001-2011) Lady Nora 2011-


Kieler Canal, September 2017

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9243851, MMSI 245739000 and call sign PBDN. Ex-Nora renamed June 2011. Owned and managed by Wijnne&Barends, Delfzijl, Netherlads. Built by Niestern Sander Delfzijl, Delfzijl, Netherlands in 2001. 

Dutch diving support vessel Vos Satisfaction 2007-


Kieler Canal, Germany September 2017

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9352224, MMSI 244626000 and call sign PHKK. Owned and managed by Vroon Offshore, Den Helder, Netherlands. Built by ABG Surat Shipyard, Surat, India in 2007. 

German patrol vessel Glückstadt 2011-

Kieler Canal, Germany September 2017

Germany-flagged. Customs service. Baptized on 25 November 2011. 

American clipper Sirocco arrived in California coming from New York, USA according to the American newspaper Sacramento Daily Union dated 12 July 1853

An item dated 10th reported the arrival of the clipper Sirocco master Sanford coming in 149 days from New York with a cargo for Alsop&co. 

Dutch bark Oostenburg sold towards Norway according to the Dutch newspaper Rotterdamsch nieuwsblad dated 13 September 1898

An item dated Delfzijl, Netherlands 11th reported that the there lying laid up Dutch bark Oostenburg of Amsterdam, Netherlands was sold for a secret price and now Norway-flagged and as master Hansen would she be towed towards Frederiksstad, Norway.(1)

Note
1. The Oostenburg with call sign PNKM, homeport Amsterdam, Netherlands and net capacity 2.853,77 cubic metres/1.007,37 tons of 2,83 cubic metres?

Dutch screw steamship 1st class Zr. Ms. Van Sepijk ready for trails according to the Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 18 August 1883



An item reported that the Dutch screw steam ship 1st class Van Speijk being built at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands was so far completed that she could be transferred to Willemsoord, Netherlands to execute the measured mile.(1)

Note
1. Screw steamship 1st class, also called frigate, Call sign GRBK, on stocks at the naval yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands on 9 February 1880, launched on 7 June 1882, commissioned on 1 March 1887, decommissioned on 6 September 1897 and stricken, converted into accommodation ship for the shipyard division at Den Helder, Netherlands in 1904, transferred from Den Helder to the Coenhaven, Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1942 and sold to be broken up at Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht begin March 1946. Displacement 3.575 ton, horsepower 2.891 hp, speed 14,25 miles, her crew numbered 280 men and an armament of 6-17cm guns, 8-12cm guns. Iron-built and wood-planked. The engines and boilers were manufactured by the Koninklijke Fabriek van Stoom- en andere werktuigen te Amsterdam, Netherlands. 

Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde at Vlissingen, Netherlands repaired engine and boiler of Dutch pilot transport schooner De Schelde in 1903

In the order administration dated 7 February 1903 was the order for account of the Dutch Department of Navy described as repairing engine and boiler of the Dutch pilot transport schooner De Schelde. Contracted price ƒ 2.980.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands 1875-1970 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen T.214.1217). 

Dutch row gunboat no. 14 stationed in the roads of Samarang, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche staatscourant dated 6 August 1864

An item referred to tidings dated 14 June 1864 dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies reported that the Dutch row gunboat no. 14 lieutenant 2nd class C.H. Boagert served as guard ship in the roads of Samarang, Dutch East Indies. 

Dutch screw steamship Drenthe arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 3rd June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 2nd reported the arrival of the Dutch steamship Drenthe coming from Rotterdam, Netherlands and Marseille, France, shipping agents Rotterdamsche Lloyd.

Note
1. Screw steamship, homeport Rotterdam, Netherlands, call sign NMHF, horsepower 220hp and net capacity 4.924,67 cubic metres/1.738,41 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

Dutch screw steamship Celebes arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 27 June 1889

An item dated 26th reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the Dutch screw steamship Celebes underway from Amsterdam, Netherlands towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Arrived there the same day, master Wilkens, coming from Amsterdam, Genoa, Italy and Padang, Dutch East Indies, shipping agents Java Agency Company limited.(1)

Note
1. Homeport Amsterdam, Netherlands, call sign NJSK, net capacity 4.268,34 cubic metres/1.506,72 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

Japanese armoured cruiser Iwate 1898-1947

Asama

Izumo-class

Building ordered on 19 July 1898, Part of the Izumo-class armoured cruisers consisting of the Izuma and Iwate, preceded by the Asama-class and succeeded by the Yakumo. Designed by Sir Philip Watts. Laid down by Armstrong Whitworth&Co., Elswick, England on 11 November 1898, launched on 29 March 1900, completed on 18 March 1901, reclassified 1st class coastal defence ship on 1 September 1921, reclassified 1st class cruiser on 1 July 1942, reclassified training ship in 1943, sunk due to an American air attack at Kure on 25 July 1945, stricken on 30 November 1945 and broken up by Harima Dock Company between 1946-1947.

Displacement 9.243 (normal load)-10.234(full load) tons and as dimensions 121,92 (between perpendiculars)-132,28 (overall) x 20,94 x 7,21-7,25 metres or 400.0-434.0 x 68.8 x 23.8-23.0 feet. Machinery consisted of 2 vertical triple expansion steam engines and 24 Belleville boilers supplying via 2 shafts 14.500 ihp allowing a speed of 20,75 (design)-22,3 (trials) knots. With a speed of 10 knots and a maximum coal bunker capacity of 1.551 tons was the range 7.000 nautical miles. Crew numbered 672 men. The Krupp cemented armour consisted of a 8,8cm/3.5”-17,8cm/7.0” thick waterline belt, a 6,3cm/2.5” thick deck, 12,7cm/5.” bulkheads with the gun turrets, barbettes, casemate and conning tower protected by respectively 16cm/6.3”, 15,2cm/6.0”, 5,1cm/2.0”-15,2cm/6.0” and 35,6cm/14.0”. Original armament consisted of 2x2-20,3cm/8” /45 type 41 naval guns, 14x1-15,2cm/6” quick firing guns, 12x1-12pd/12cwt quick firing guns, 8x1-7,6cm/2.5pd Yamauchi quick firing guns and 4x1-45,7cm/18.0” submerged torpedo tubes (2xbroad side). 

Japanese armoured cruiser Izumo 1898-1947

Asama

Izumo-class

Part of the Izumo-class armoured cruisers consisting of the Izuma and Iwate, preceded by the Asama-class and succeeded by the Yakumo. Designed by Sir Philip Watts. Building ordered on 24 September 1897. Laid down by Armstrong Whitworth&Co., Elswick, England on 14 May 1898, launched on 13 September 1899, completed on 25 September 1900, reclassified as 1st class coastal defence ship on 1 September 1921, used in the 192s as cadet training ship, modernized 1930-1931 and 1935 reclassified as 1st class cruiser on 1 July 1942, reclassified as training ship for cadets in 1943, sunk due to an American air attack at Kure on 28 July 1945, stricken on 20 November 1945 and broken up by the Harima Dock Company in 1947.

Displacement 9.503 (normal load)-10.305 (full load)-10.864 (after refitting 1935) tons and as dimensions 121,92 (between perpendiculars)-132,28 (overall) x 20,94 x 7,21-7,25 metres or 400.0-434.0 x 68.8 x 23.8-23.0 feet. Machinery consisted of 2 vertical triple expansion steam engines and 24 Belleville boilers supplying via 2 shafts 7.000 (after 1935)-14.500 ihp allowing a speed of 16 (after 1935)-20,75 (design)-21,74 (trials) knots. With a speed of 10 knots and a maximum coal bunker capacity of 1.551 tons was the range 7.000 nautical miles. Since 1935 bunker capacity 1.429 tons coals and 329 tons fuel oil. Crew numbered 672 men. The Krupp cemented armour consisted of a 8,8cm/3.5”-17,8cm/7.0” thick waterline belt, a 6,3cm/2.5” thick deck, 12,7cm/5.” bulkheads with the gun turrets, barbettes, casemate and conning tower protected by respectively 16cm/6.3”, 15,2cm/6.0”, 5,1cm/2.0”-15,2cm/6.0” and 35,6cm/14.0”. Original armament consisted of 2x2-20,3cm/8” /45 type 41 naval guns, 14x1-15,2cm/6” quick firing guns, 12x1-12pd/12cwt quick firing guns, 8x1-7,6cm/2.5pd Yamauchi quick firing guns and 4x1-45,7cm/18.0” submerged torpedo tubes (2xbroad side). 

Sunday, 24 September 2017

Swedish navy ordering armour plates for coastal defence ship Oden according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1895-1896 No. 7


An item reported that the Swedish navy ordered the armour plates for the armoured gunboat Oden from the same firm which delivered a test plate.(1)

Note
1. Of the Oden-class coastal defence ships consisting of the Oden, Njord and Thor, laid down by Bergsund At Finnboda shipyard, Stockholm, Sweden in 1894, launched on 9 March 1896, completed on 8 June 1997 and stricken in 1937. 

Gun exploded on board of French coastal defence ship Bouvines according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1895-1896 No. 7

An item reported that during gun exercises on board of the Bouvines a grenade of the 4,7cm Hotchkiss gun mounted in the top caused a bursting flame killing a sailor with a 1st lieutenant severe wounded and a second 1st lieutenant and the vice admiral slight wounded.(1)

Note
1. Of the Bouvines-class battleships consisting of the Amiral Tréhouart and Bouvines, preceded by the Jemmapes-class. Laid down by F.C. de la Méditerranée, La Seyne, France in September 1890, launched on 29 March 1893, completed in December 1894 and stricken in 1920. 

French protected cruiser Linois executing trials according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1895-1896 No. 7

An item reported that the Linois on her official trial with a lot of sea and wind achieved a speed of nearly 20 miles with 170 rpm and in a calm sea with 147 rpm a speed of 18,42 miles.(1)

Note
1. Of the Linois-class consisting of the Linois, Lavoisier and Galilée. Laid down by F.C. de la Méditerranée, La Seyne, France in August 1892, launched on 30 January 1894, completed in 1895 and stricken in 1910. 

Italian torpedo cruiser Caprera executing trials according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1895-1896 No. 7

An item reported that the Italian torpedo cruiser Caprera achieved on her trial with 2.200 ihp and a natural draft a speed of 17 miles.(1)

Note
1. Part of the Partenope-class consisting of the Partenope, Caprera, Minerva, Euridice, Urania, Uretasa, Iride and Calatafirmi, preceded by the Folgore-class and succeeded by the Agordat-class.Laid down by Cantiere navale fratelli Orlando. Livorno, Italy on 27 July 1891, launched on 6 May 1894, commissioned on 12 December 1895 and sold to be broken up in May 1913. 

American protected cruiser USS Chicago planned to be modernized according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1895-1896 No. 7

An item referred to the Army and Naval Journal reporting that the US Navy intended to fit out the cruiser Chicago with tube boilers, replace the old guns by quick firing guns and decrease the rigging. For this purpose was a budget of 400.000 US dollars needed.(1)

Note
1. Building ordered on 3 March 1883, awarded on 26 July 1883, laid down by John Roach&Sons, Chester, Pennsylvania, USA on 29 December 1883, launched by Edith Cieborne on 5 December 1885, commissioned on 17 April 1889, classified CA-14 on 17 July 1921, classified CL-14 on 8 August 1921, decommissioned on 30 September 1923, renamed as receiving ship Alton and reclassified IX-5 on 16 July 1928, sold on 15 May 1936 and foundered in the Pacific in Mid July 1936. 

Dutch harbour diving vessel Hr. Ms. Nautilus (Y8126 and later A849) 1964-1993


Laid down by Rijkswerf Willemsoord, Den Helder, Netherlands on 17 March 1964, launched on 1 May 1964, commissioned on 20 April 1965, decommissioned on 2 June 1992, stricken on 7 April 1993 and sold for ƒ 101.323 to A.D. Veenman, Enkhuizen, Netherlands. In 2013 still existing although et another private owner. Displacement 69,305 tons and as dimensions 23,284 x 5,148 x 1,347 metres. Made of welded steel, structure aluminium and teak decks. Crew numbered 8 men to which a female medical officer was added to supply medical support .to the divers. One screw, 105hp Volvo Penta diesel engine and a speed of 9 knots. Call signs were Y8126 and laterA849. When dive operations were going was the vessel fixed on her position with the use of 3 anchor chains with a length of 220 metres. The aft deck with as dimensions 6x5 metres was fitted out with a crane. Not armed. 

Dutch frigate Hr. Ms. Van Nes (F 805) 1963-1988 and Indonesia KRI Oswald Siahaan 1988-


Laid down buy Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen on 25 July 1963, launched on 26 March 1966, commissioned on 9 August 1967, sold to Indonesia on 22 May 1987, decommissioned on 31 October 1987, handed over to Indonesia on 1 November 1988 and commissioned in the Indonesian navy as the KRI Oswald Siahaan (354). Modified British Leander-class design and commissioned in the Royal Netherlands Navy as the Van Speijk-class, consisting of the Isaac Sweers, Van Speijk, Van Nes, Tjerk Hiddes, Evertsen and Van Galen.

Displacement 2.200 tons standard as dimensions 113,4 x 12,5 x 4,2metres. Crew in Dutch service numbered 256 (original)-185 (after modernisation) men.  The steam turbines allowed a speed of 28,5 knots. Original armament consisted of 2-11,43cm/4.5” guns, 2 anti aircraft Sea Cat, Mk10 Limbo depth cargo mortars and a Westland Wasp helicopter. After the modernisation 1-7,6cm/3” Oto Melara gun, 2 anti aircraft Sea Cat, Harpoon against surface targets, 6 Mk44 torpedo tubes and a Westland Lynx helicopter. 

Dutch frigate Hr. Ms. Jaguar (F822) 1952-1987


Part of the Roofdier-class consisting of the Wolf, Fret, Hermelijn, Vos, Panter en Jaguar. Laid down as the PCE 1609 by Avondale Marine Incorporation Ways, New Orleans, USA on 10 December 1952, launched on 20 March 1954, commissioned at New Orleans on 11 June 1954, decommissioned on 22 December 1983, stricken on 1 January 1983 and with her sister ships Panter, Hermelijn and Vos sold for totally ƒ 164.096,00 to the firm Heuvelman B.V., Veenendaal, Netherlands to be broken up on 30 June 1987.

Maximum displacement 945 tons and as dimensions 56,7 x 10,29 x 2,95 metres. Machinery consisted of 2 diesels allowing a maximum speed of 15 knots. Crew numbered 80 men. Armament consisted of 1-7,6cm gun, 2-4cm guns, 2-2cm guns, hedgehog depth charge mortar. 

Dutch survey vessel Hr. Ms. Buyskes (A 904) 1972-2004 and Latvian law enforce vessel Varonis (A90) 2004-


Laid down by Boele’s Scheepswerven en machinefabrieken N.V., Bolnes, Netherlands on 31 January 1972, launched on 11 July 1972, commissioned on 9 March 1973, decommissioned on 11 December 2003, handed over to Latvia and renamed Varonis in 2004. In Dutch service numbered her crew 43 men. Displacement 867 (standard)-1.050 tons and as dimensions 58,80 x 11,13 x 3,70 metres. Diesel-electric machinery consisted of 3x700hp Werkspoor diesel generators 8FCHD 240. Speed 14 knots. As Varonis Latvia-flagged, MMSI 275307000 and call sign YLNU. 

Dutch submarine chaser Hr. Ms. Friesland (D 812) 1953-1979



Part of the Friesland-class submarine chaser or destroyers specialized in anti submarine warfare, consisting of the Friesland, Groningen, Limburg, Overijssel, Drenthe, Utrecht, Rotterdam and Amsterdam, preceded by the somewhat smaller Holland-class and succeeded by the Kortenaer-class frigates. All her sister ships were sold to Peru. Laid down by Nederlandsche Dok en Scheepsbouw Maatschappij (NSDM), Amsterdam, Netherlands on 17 December 1951, launched on 21 February 1953, commissioned on 22 March 1956 and decommissioned on 29 June 1979.

With a displacement of 2.497 (standard)-3.070 (full load) tons and as dimensions 116 x 11,7 x 5,2 metres or 381 x 38 x 17 feet. The machinery consisted of high and low pressire geared turbines and 2x2 Babcock&Wilcox super-heated steam and 620psiboilers delivering 60.000hp allowing a design speed of 36 knots. With a speed of 18 knots still a range of 4.000 nautical miles. Crew numbered 284 men. Armament consisted of 3x2-12cm/4,72” Bofors guns, 6x1-4cm/1.57” Bofors anti aircraft guns, 2xquad--35,7cm anti-submarine mortars and 2 depth charge racks. 

The Albanian harbours of Vlone Durrës and Sarandë according to an American intelligence report dated 15 March 1950

The harbour of Vlone possessed over 3 cranes handed over by the Soviet Union. For storage of cargoes was a warehouse available with a capacity of 5.000 tons and 3 large gas tanks. Ships with a tonnage larger than 2.000 tons were not loaded or unloaded in this harbour. The six tugs had a varying tonnage of 50-80 tons.

The harbour of Durrës which was also the naval base was enlarged and fitted out with a breakwater. Ships with a maximum tonnage of 6.000 tons could load or unload here if needed with the assistance of 4 cranes and 8 tugs with a varying tonnage between 50-80 tons. Warships and merchant ships could be repaired on the local shipyard.

The harbour of Sarandë was hardly visited by ships despite the fact being deep enough to be entered by large ships. Available were 2 tugs and one crane.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, Document number CIA-RDP82-00457R004500130007-5. 

The Albanian merchant marine according to an American intelligence report dated 15 March 1950

An item reported that the merchant marine had a total tonnage of around 2.500 tons although none of these were steamships, so apparently just sailing vessels. The fleet consisted of:
12 wooden vessels built in Italy of the Liountress type of varying tons, 2-60 tons, 2-30 tons and 9-20 tons.
20 vessels , mostly of the Italian Trampakolo type of varying tonnage namely 1-300 tons, 2-250 tons, 3-100 tons and 14 between the 50-100 tons.
9 sailing fighting boats [(fishery?], made in Italy with a tonnage of 50-70 tons.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, Document number CIA-RDP82-00457R004500130007-5. 

The Albanian navy according to an American intelligence report dated 15 March 1950

An item reported that the personnel strength of the Albanian navy around 300 men of which 50 were stationed at Tirana and 250 at the naval base at Durrës. Total tonnage of the fleet was around 500 tons, The Naval Command at Durrës was subjected to the Coast Defence MR Division.

The fleet consisted of:
One 30 tons patrol boat with a speed of 12-14 miles, armed with 2 German manufactured machine guns and a crew numbering 10 men. She was used for patrolling the area south of the Saseno Island and the Albanian coastline up to Himare.
There were 2-70 tons wooden minesweepers built in Italy, a speed of 10 miles and an armament consisting of a gun and 2 machineguns. The crew numbered 12 men to which 3 People’s Security agents were added. Both vessels were used for patrolling along the Albanian coastline as the north side of Durrës.
Two 70-tons tugs built in Italy were converted into patrol boats with a speed of 10 miles. The crew numbered 6 men to which 3 People’s Security agents were added. Armament consisted of 1 machine gun and a not specified weapon.
Eight patrol boats of which 5 were built in Italy and 3 in the Soviet Union with a tonnage varying between 15-20 tons and patrolling along the Albanian coast. The crew numbered 6 men to which 3 People’s Security agents were added. Armament consisted of 1 machine gun and a not specified weapon.
Submarines were not sighted in the harbours of Vlone, Durrës and Sarandë.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, Document number CIA-RDP82-00457R004500130007-5. 

The Albanian navy according to an American intelligence report dated 24 June 1949

An item reported that the personnel strength of the Albanian navy numbered around 600 men. The fleet consisted of the minesweepers Nos. 16 and 18 and 5 torpedo boats at Durrës, 1 torpedo boat at Sarandë and another 3 at the Island of Saseno. The minesweeper No. 18 was armed with 1 double barrelled model Breda machinegun, a speed of 6 knots, a crew numbering 12 men (included a warrant officer) and measured 20 tons. The torpedo boats at Durrës were described as being of different types, with a length of 12 metres, a speed of 13 knots and armed with 1 machinegun.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document numberCIA-RDP82-00457R002900260004-2. 

Saturday, 23 September 2017

Panama-flagged research survey vessel (ex-Karin June, Karen Wood -1996, Karen June 1996-1998, Prelude, American Champion 1998, Atlantic Enterprise 1998-2015, Geco Triton 2015-2017?) Atlantic Enterprise 2017-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 23 September 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 7202554, MMSI 355468000 and call sign 3FJK8. As the Geco Triton owned and managed by Westerngeco, London, United Kingdom, Built by Signal Ship Repair, Mobile, Alabama, USA. Ex-Karen June renamed January …, Karen Wood renamed March 1996, Karen June renamed March 1997, Prelude renamed January 1991? American Champion renamed July 1998, Atlantic Enterprise renamed April 2015 and Geco Triton renamed 2017? Part of the fleet of Atlantic Marine?

Japanese battleship Yashima 1894-1904


Part of the Fuji-class consisting of the Fuji and the Yashima, preceded by the Kongo-class and succeeded by the Shikishima-class. A with around 2.000 tons decreased but in many ways improved British Royal Sovereign-class battleships design. Fuji was designed by George C. Mackrow and the Yashima by Philip Watts.(1) Building ordered under the 1894 Naval Programme. Laid down by Armstrong, Whitworth&Co., Elswick, England on 6 December 1894, launched on 28 December 1896, sea trials executed in September 1897, completed on 9 September 1897 and heavily damaged after striking Russian mines she sunk on 15 May 1904. Fitted out to serve as flagship for the admiral. 

Displacement 12.430 tons (normal) and as dimensions 125,6 (over all) x 22,25 x 7,925 (full load0  metres or 412 x 72 x 26 feet. The machinery consisted of 2 vertical triple expansion steam engines and 10 cylindrical boilers supplying via 2 shafts 13.500 ihp (design)-14.075 ihp (sea trials) with forced draught allowing a speed of 18,25 (design)-19,46 (trial) knots and with a speed of 10 knots and a maximum coal bunker capacity of 1.200 tons was the range 4.000 nautical miles. Crew numbered 650 men. Original armament consisted of 2x2-30,5cm/12” guns, 10x1-15,2cm/6” quick firing guns, 20x1-4,7cm/1.9”/3pd guns, 4x1-4,7cm/1.9”/2,5 pd Hotchkiss guns and 5-45,72cm/18” torpedo tubes. The Harvey steel made armour consisted of a 35,6cm/14”-45,7cm/18” thick deck, a 6,4cm/2.5” thick deck while the gun turrets were protected by 15,2cm/6” thick armour. 

Note
1. Philip Watts (30 May 1846 Deptford, Kent, England-15 March 1926 Chelsea, London, England), naval architect who designed also the British HMS Dreadnought, but also designed ships for navies all over the world. Worked for the British Royal Navy and for Armstrong, Whitworth&Co., Elswick, England

Japanese battleship Fuji 1894-1948


Part of the Fuji-class consisting of the Fuji and the Yashima, preceded by the Kongo-class and succeeded by the Shikishima-class. A with around 2.000 tons decreased but in many ways improved British Royal Sovereign-class battleships design. Fuji was designed by George C. Mackrow (1) and the Yashima by Philip Watts. Building ordered under the 1894 Naval Programme. Laid down by Thames Iron Works and Shipbuilding Company, Leamouth, London, England on 1 August 1894, launched on 31 March 1896, commissioned on 8 Auguts 1897, completed on 17 August 1897, modernized receiving new Miyabara water-tube boilers and Japanese manufactured guns, reclassified as training hulk and barrack on 1 September 1922, stationed since then at Yokosuka, decommissioned in 1923, damaged during an American air attack on 18 July 1945, sunk after the war and broken up in 1948.

Displacement 12.430 tons (normal) and as dimensions 125,6 (over all) x 22,25 x 7,925 (full load0  metres or 412 x 72 x 26 feet. The machinery consisted of 2 vertical triple expansion steam engines and 10 cylindrical boilers supplying via 2 shafts 13.500 ihp with forced draught allowing a speed of 18 (design)-18,5 (trial) knots and with a speed of 10 knots and a maximum coal bunker capacity of 1.200 tons was the range 4.000 nautical miles. Crew numbered 650 men. Original armament consisted of 2x2-30,5cm/12” guns, 10x1-15,2cm/6” quick firing guns, 20x1-4,7cm/1.9”/3pd guns, 4x1-4,7cm/1.9”/2,5 pd Hotchkiss guns and 5-45,72cm/18” torpedo tubes. The Harvey steel made armour consisted of a 35,6cm/14”-45,7cm/18” thick deck, a 6,4cm/2.5” thick deck while the gun turrets were protected by 15,2cm/6” thick armour.

Note
1. Georg Colby Mackrow (7 March 1830 born/11 April 1830 baptized Limehouse-7 February1907), naval architect of the shipyard. 

Soviet warships passing Japanese coast according to a report of the American intelligence dated 16 July 1951

An item reported that two Soviet warships with the pennants X4 and X5 belonging to the 2nd Naval Squadron left on 20 June Dairen towards the south, passing Okinawa going northeast along the Japanese coast. On the 28th was the X4 on the position 147-30 and 40-00 and the X5 a day later 2:20 a.m. at 148-00 and 37-30. With a speed 0f 16 knots were the ship continuing a north east course. In the beginning of the same month was the same route followed by other Soviet warships passing Mokkaid arriving at Vladivistok.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, CIA document number CIA-RDP82-00457R008100430010-8. 

Chinese Communist navy personnel training according to a report of the American intelligence dated 25 July 1950

An item reported that in begin summer 1950 at the naval academy at Hsiapingtao (121-29, 38-50) 6.000 cadets participated in navigation, marine engineering and gunnery courses. Recruited from the Dairen/Port Arthur, Chinchou and Antung areas were they divided over 4 battalions. There were 2 small gunboats available for the training. So-called ‘infected’ personnel belonging to the Nationalist navy were taken in custody and next reindoctrinated and trained in barracks earlier used by the Japanese armed forces at Lungtou, Port Arthur.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, CIA document number CIA-RDP82-00457R005400180011-5. 

Russian naval forces at Port Arthur according to a report of the American intelligence dated 7 September 1951

An item reported that on 21 August in the Port Arthur-Dairen area a destroyer squadron was active consisting of 10 German Na-wei-kó type 2 destroyers commanded by Kan-na-wei-chí, commander-in-chief of the Port Arthur-Dairen area. Apparently it was stationed at Vladivostok. According to added comments were it possible Narvik-type destroyers (1) and that Karmanovski was naval commander.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, CIA document number CIA-RDP82-00457R008500610001-4.

Note
1. German Type 1936A and Type1936A (Mob) of Narvik-class destroyers, displacement 2.600 (standard)-3.605 (maximum) tons and as dimensions 127 x 12 x 4,65 metres or 416.8” x 39.4 x 15.3”. Horsepower 70.000 hp, speed 37,5 knots. Crew numbering 220 men. The Z33, laid down on 22 December 1940 was after the Second World War added to the Soviet fleet and renamed Provorniy and sunk while used as a target in 1961. Armament consisted of 1x2&3x1-15cm guns as main artillery armament and 8-53,3cm torpedo tubes. 

Russian naval-shore fortifications and submarine pens at Port Arthur according to a report of the American intelligence dated 17 May 1948

The report dealing with the Soviet naval forces stationed at Port Arthur supplied interesting details. The Second World War in which the USA and the Soviet Union were allies against the Axis powers had only passed 2 years. Tensions grew to the Western powers (including the USA) and the Soviet Union and satellite states ending in a period called the Cold War, not earlier ending as in 1991. The document dates from the first stage of the Cold War.

An item reported that in December 1947 the naval-shore fortifications were completed. Supervisor during the construction was the army engineer Vasilenko, earlier involved as chief construction engineer at the fortifications at Kronstadt. The fortifications were spread over a land area with a depth of 20 miles excluded the fortified island. All defence works were now part of the Changshan Archipelago (122-30, 39-15). The covered submarine pens in the naval-shore fortified sector in the Guangchinshan (121º.15’30” and 38º.47’45”). The channel between the gulf and the outer bay was considerably widened. Responsible for the actual defence was the Far Eastern Naval Rifle Brigade (comparable with marines) depending on heavy artillery for support if needed.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, CIA document number CIA-RDP82-00457R001500510009-4. 

Russian naval forces at Port Arthur according to a report of the American intelligence dated 4 October 1948

The report dealing with the Soviet naval forces stationed at Port Arthur supplied interesting details. The Second World War in which the USA and the Soviet Union were allies against the Axis powers had only passed 2 years. Tensions grew to the Western powers (including the USA) and the Soviet Union and satellite states ending in a period called the Cold War, not earlier ending as in 1991. The document dates from the first stage of the Cold War.

May 1948 were in the East Harbour lying one V-19 type submarine, armed with 4 torpedo tubes and a crew numbering 21 men. Further more 6-1.300 tons submarines with a speed of 16 (surfaced)-9 (submerged) knots and an artillery armament of 2-7,62cm/3” guns. There was also an unspecified vessel with a displacement of 4.792 tons. Speed 16 knots (cruising). The crew numbered 410 men. The armament consisted of 4-22,86cm/9” (?) guns, 8-15,24cm/6” guns, 14 smaller guns and a not specified number of torpedo tubes. There were also 9 smaller vessels. In the West Harbour were lying a hospital ship which arrived there on 11 May and a 1 tanker loaded with gasoline which arrived there on 22 May.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, CIA document number CIA-RDP82-00457R001900410011-8. 

Russian naval forces at Port Arthur according to a report of the American intelligence dated 26 December 1947

The report dealing with the Soviet naval forces belonging to the Soviet Pacific 3rd Fleet stationed at Port Arthur supplied interesting details. The Second World War in which the USA and the Soviet Union were allies against the Axis powers had only passed 2 years. Tensions grew to the Western powers (including the USA) and the Soviet Union and satellite states ending in a period called the Cold War, not earlier ending as in 1991. The document dates from the first stage of the Cold War.

There were 3 Soviet submarines of the V-19 design sighted in the East Harbour. With a crew of more as 20 men consisted the armament of 4 torpedo tubes and a machinery consisting of 750hp engines. Further more was near Port Arthur a in 1935 in Germany built 250 tons submarine seen. Horsepower 750hp , 4 torpedo tubes and a crew of 22 men. There was in the same harbour also a in 1943 6.000 tons cruiser while 3 similar cruisers left on 14 August the West harbour. In the West harbour were 5 transports and another 3 submarines anchored. This were larger submarines as the ones lying in the East harbour. With a displacement of 1.300 tons was their speed 16 (surfaced)-10 (submerged) knots. Their artillery armament consisted of 2-7,62cm/3” guns. Again was there also a large 1.300 tons German submarine with a speed of 17 (surfaced)-10 9submerged) knits and armed with 2-7,62cm/3” guns. Mine fields were laid to outside the harbours as protection.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, CIA document number CIA-RDP82-00457R001200110008-2. 

Swedish galley Adlerfelt 1742-1774

Built at Stockholm in 1742, last mentioned in 1774, with an armament of 3 guns.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Lowen 1739-1787

Built at Stockholm in 1739, last mentioned in 1787, with an armament of 3 guns.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Akerhielm 1739-1733

Built at Stockholm in 1739, last mentioned in 1774, with an armament of 3 guns.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Lagerberg 1737-1761

Built at Stockholm in 1737, last mentioned in 1761.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley De la Gardie 1736-1766

Built at Stockholm in 1736, last mentioned >1761-1766<

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. Reports last mentioned in 1761, correspondence with Jan Glete last mentioned 1766. 

Swedish galley Baner 1736-1761

Built at Stockholm in 1736, last mentioned in 1761.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Friday, 22 September 2017

Dutch fishing vessel Adriana Maatje (TH-5) 1985-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 8411645, MMSI 245415000 and call sign PCDG. Built by Van Santen Constructie, Sliedrecht, Netherlands in 1985. 

Singapore oil/chemical tanker (ex-Alexander 1998-2003, Garonne 2003-2004, Gironde 2004-2005, Songa Aneline 2005-2007) Sichem Aneline 2007-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9171735, MMSI 538002315 and call sign V7HV3. Owned by Eitzen Chemical Singapore, Singapore and managed by Selandia Shipmanagement India, Mumbai, India. Built by Astillero Barreras, Vigo, Spain in 1998. Ex-Alexander renamed June 2003, Garonne renamed April 2004, Gironde renamed July 2005 and Songa Aneline renamed January 2007. 

Dutch general cargo ship (ex-Sabinia 2000-2006, Westgard 2006-2015) Westborg 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Delfzijl, Netherlands, IMO 9196187, MMSI 246457000 and call sign PDBQ. Part of fleet of Royal Wagenborg, Delfzijl, Netherlands. As the Westgard, Netherlands-flagged, homeport Rotterdam, Netherlands owned and managed by Bore, Helsinki, Finland. Ex-Sabinia renamed January 2006. Built by Peters Shipyard, Kampen, Netherlands in 2000. Renamed Westgard on April 2015. 

Dutch containership (ex-Sea Baltica 1996-2005, Maersk Roscoff 2005-2008) Evolution 2008-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Harlingen, IMO 9136228, MMSI 246386000 and call sign PHHV. Ex-Sea Baltica renamed July 2005 and Maersk Roscoff renamed November 2008. Owned and managed by JR Shipping, Harlingen, Netherlands. Built by YVC Ysselwerf, Capelle aan den Ijssel, Netherlands in 1996. 

Budget for Norwegian submarine approved according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1902-1903 no. 8

An item referred to the le Yacht reporting that the budget of 466.000 francs for building a Holland type submarine for Norway was approved. 

Swedish galley Gref Sparre 1730-1774

Of Italian construction, built at Stockholm in 1730, last mentioned in 1774, with an armament of 3 guns.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Ducker 1726-1769

Built at Vastervik in 1726, last mentioned in 1769.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Tessin 1726-1786

Built at Vastervik in 1726, rebuilt as a ‘hast’ galley in 1754, last mentioned in 1786, with an armament of 2 guns.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Stadsvarvet 1725-1758

Built at Stockholm in 1725, last mentioned in 1758.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Dutch container ship (ex-Miriam Borchard 2001-2004, Berit 2004, Holland Maas Habana 2004-2005, Berit 2005-2009, WEC Dalie 2009-2013, Berit 2013) WEC Vermeer 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Cyprus-flagged, homeport Limassol, IMO 9237371, MMSI 209177000 and 5BLR3. Built by JJ Sietas Schiffswerft, Hamburg, Germany in 2001. As the Berit owned and managed by Voge Heinz Georg, Stade, Germany. Ex-Miriam Borchard (of Borchard Lines Ltd.) renamed February 2004, Berit (of MS Berit Heinz-Georg Voge KG) renamed March 2004, Holland Maas Habana (chartered by Holland Maas Container Line) renamed June 205, Berit of MS Berit Heinz-Georg Voge KG) renamed October 2009, WEC Dali (chartered by West European Container Lines) renamed March 2013 and Berit renamed in … As WEC Vermeer chartered by Holland Maas Scheepvaartbeheer III B.V., Rotterdam, Netherlands or owned by Holland Maas Scheepvaartbeheer III B.V., Limasol, Cyprus and managed by WEC Lines B.V., Rotterdam. 

Polish bulk carrier Kociewie 2009-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 September 2017

Bahamas-flagged, homeport Nassau, IMO 9423798, MMSI 311014100 and call sign C6XM5. Owned and managed by Polsteam, Ssczecin, Poland. Built by Xingang Shipbuilding Heavy Industry, Tianjin, China in 2009. 

Liberian crude oil tanker Primorsky Prospect 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 September 2017

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, IMO 9511533, MMSI 636014355 and call sign A8TH5. Owned and managed by SCF Unicom Singapore, Monrovia, Liberia. Built by Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries, Samho, South Korea in 2010. 

Monaco oil/chemical tanker STI Westminster 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Marshall slands-flagged, IMO 9706437, MMSI 538005539 and call sign V7EV3. Owned and managed by Scorpio Commercial Management, Monaco. Built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2015. 

Monaco oil/chemical tanker STI Finchley 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9696565, MMSI 538005406 and call sign V7DB8.
Owned and managed by Scorpio Commercial Management, Monaco. Built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2014. 

Costa Rican reefer Dole Europa 1994-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Bahamas-flagged, homeport Nassau, Bahamas, IMO 9046514, MMSI 311296000 and call sign C6FS5. Built by Gdansk Shipyard, Gdansk, Poland in 1994. Owned and managed by Reefership Marine Services, San Jose, Costa Rica. 

British oil/chemical tanker Crystal Topaz 2006-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Malta flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9327047, MMSI 248075000 and call sign 9HA2164. With a gross tonnage of 7.903 tons and summer deadweight of 11.340 tons and as dimensions 125 x 20 x 7,4 metres. Homeport Valletta. Build in 2006 at the shipyard of Sekwang Heavy Industries Mokpo at Mokpo, South Korea. Owned by Crystal Pool UK, London, England  and managed by Crystal Pool of Genoa, Italy. 

Norwegian oil/chemical tanker (ex-Serra D 2005-2006, Vedrey Heden 2006-2008, Brovig Marine 2008-2015) Key Marin 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Gibraltar-flagged, IMO 9297228, MMSI 236342000 and call sign ZDHP4. Built by Turkter Shipyard, Istanbul, Turkey in 2005. As the Brovig Marin owned by Fjord Shipping, Maaloy, Norway and managed by Columbia Shipmanagement, Limassol, Cyprus. Ex-Serra D renamed August 2006 and Vedrey Heden renamed December 2008. As the Key Marin owned by Key Shipping AS and operated by Columbia Shipmanagement Ltd. Other sources reporting owned and managed by Kokoda Tankers Farsund, Norway or part of the fleet of Sea Tank Chartering AS. 

Cypriot oil/chemical tanker Stena Image 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Bermuda-flagged, homeport Hamilton, IMO 9667473, MMSI 310683000 and call sign ZCEM7. Built as Guangzhou 12130002 by Guangzhou International Shipyard, Guangzhou, China in 2015. Owned by Stena MR Cyprus, Limassol. Cyprus and managed by Stena Bulk, Gothenburg, Sweden. 

Belgian anchor handling tug (ex- Leo Bay 1999, Torm Heron 1999-2004, Howard Hogue 2004-2005, Sea Lynx 2005-2016) Union Lynx 2016-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 September 2017

Belgium-flagged, IMO 9178410, MMSI 205695000 and call sign ORRW. KMAR404-design. As the Sea Lynx owned by Deep Sra Supply and managed by Deep Sea Supply Management Singapore, both of Limassol, Cyprus. Norway-flagged, homeport Arendal. Ex-Leo Bay renamed 1999, Torm Heron renamed May 2004, Howard Hogue renamed September 2005, Sea Lyn renamed in 2016 and MMSI 258567000. Built by Loland Verft, Leirvik i Sogn, Norway with yard number 281in 1999. Renamed after 6 March 2016 Union Lynx and taken over by Boskalis Offshore BV, Antwerp, Belgium. Gross tonnage 2.556 tons, net tonnage 810 tons, deadweight 2.900 tons and as dimensions 74 x 17 x 6,1 metres. Horsepower 15.000 ahp. 

Dutch deck cargo pontoon (ex-Discovery II 2010-2011) CC Atlantique 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 September 2017

IMO 9562245. Built in 2010. Ex-Discovery II renamed May 2011. Owned and managed by Acta Marine, Den Helder, Netherlands. Curacao-flagged. Built by Sainty Yangzhou Shipbuilding, Yangzhou, China in 2010. 

Wednesday, 20 September 2017

Coal bunker procedure in the harbour of Havana, Cuba as described by the commanding officer f the Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Holland in 1917


The Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Holland (1) captain J.H. Zeeman departed on 2 December 1916 at 11.40 o’clock the roads of Nieuwediep, Netherlands towards the Dutch West Indies. Her commanding officer described in his report the coal bunker procedure followed at Havana, Cuba. It was the first harbour where the coal bunker procedure was mechanized. The Havana Coal Company possessed large lighters fitted out with a coal lift comparable with the system of a bucket dredger. The buckets were fitted to a chain of which the ends were connected to each other. The buckets were emptied via a flexible iron tube into the loading ports of the bunkers. This loading went very fast although there was a problem with the arrangement of the bunkers on board of the Holland. The tube had to be moved when a bunker was full and this went considerable slow. On both sides of the ship was the coal loaded resulting in 480 tons in 8 hour or 60 ton/hour. 

Note
1. Of the Holland-class protected cruisers consisting of the Holland, Zeeland and Friesland as the 1st subclass and the Gelderland, Noord-Brabant and Utrecht of the 2nd subclass. Laid down at the Rijkswerf Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1895, launched on 4 October 1896, commissioned on 1 July 1898 and sold on a public auction at 11.00 o’clock the navy yard at Willemsoord, Netherlands on Wednesday 21 January 1920. 

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1916-1917.

Coal bunker procedure in the harbour of Curacao, Dutch West Indies as described by the commanding officer of the Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Holland in 1917


The Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Holland (1) captain J.H. Zeeman departed on 2 December 1916 at 11.40 o’clock the roads of Nieuwediep, Netherlands towards the Dutch West Indies. Her commanding officer described in his report the coal bunker procedure followed at Curacao, Dutch West Indies. The ship was moored alongside the coal quay and via 2 gangways were baskets filled with 25-30 kilo coals carried by dock coolies. In around 8 net hours was in this manner 645 ton loaded or around 80 tons a hour. In the first hour went the loading much faster in contrary to the last hours.

Note
1. Of the Holland-class protected cruisers consisting of the Holland, Zeeland and Friesland as the 1st subclass and the Gelderland, Noord-Brabant and Utrecht of the 2nd subclass. Laid down at the Rijkswerf Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1895, launched on 4 October 1896, commissioned on 1 July 1898 and sold on a public auction at 11.00 o’clock the navy yard at Willemsoord, Netherlands on Wednesday 21 January 1920 .

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1916-1917. 

Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Holland visited La Luz, Gran Canaria in December 1916


Dutch Hr. Ms. Holland

Spanish Princesa de Asturias

The Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Holland (1) captain J.H. Zeeman departed on 2 December 1916 at 11.40 o’clock the roads of Nieuwediep, Netherlands towards the Dutch West Indies. On the 13th she arrived at Vigo, continuing her voyage on the 19th towards Las Palmas/La Luz, Gran Canaria where she arrived on the 23rd, after bunkering coal she left the next day arrived at Curacao, Dutch West Indies on 7 January 1917 at 09.00 ‘’clock. At La Luz were warships no longer allowed to enter the inner harbour. There was however made an exception for the Holland under the excuse that the sea in the outer harbour was to heavy for bunkering. The major space in the inner harbour was now by 14 large German and Austrian steamships. Some time ordered the Spanish government those ships were to leave the roads where the major part had been lying since the outbreak of the war. When the Holland was in the outer harbour the Spanish ironclad Princesa de Asturias (2) lying departed in the morning of the 24th and replaced by the shortly afterwards arriving gunboat Laya.(3) With the commander of the Princesa de Asturias captain Francisco de Barredio y Mirandio were visits exchanged. Coal bunkering was by the Dutch commander as follows described. Prows loaded with coal sacks weighing around 100 kilo were lying waiting to be called. Between the prow and the ship to be loaded was a boat fitted out with 2 steam winches lying. This boat was able to lift 8 sacks of coal or about 800 kilo at once. On board was with the help of convenient carts the coal loaded in the bunkers and within 9 hours 554 ton coal bunkered.

Notes
1. Of the Holland-class protected cruisers consisting of the Holland, Zeeland and Friesland as the 1st subclass and the Gelderland, Noord-Brabant and Utrecht of the 2nd subclass. Laid down at the Rijkswerf Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1895, launched on 4 October 1896, commissioned on 1 July 1898 and sold on a public auction at 11.00 o’clock the navy yard at Willemsoord, Netherlands on Wednesday 21 January 1920 .
2. Of the Princesa de Asturias class armoured cruisers consisting of the Princesa de Asturias, Cataluna and Cardenal de Cisneros. Laid down by Arsenal de la Caracca, Spain on 23 September 1889, launched on 17 October 1896, completed on 10 June 1903 and stricken in December 1927.
3. Of the Recalde-class consisting of the Recalde, Laya, Bonifaz and Lauria. Laid down by SECN, Cartagena, Spain in December 1910, launched on 3 April 1912, completed in August 1912 and stricken in May 1940.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1916-1917. 

Torpedoes trimmed in the Dutch East Indies according to the Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1887-1888

An item reported that in 1886-1887 the Royal Netherlands Navy tested two in the Netherlands prepared fish torpedoes in the Dutch East Indies to become aware what the effects were of a political climate. It became clear after examining the torpedoes that these were no longer in ready condition. The vertical rudders needed to be trimmed, the torpedoes disassembled, cleaned and trimmed again to get the same launch results as before the torpedoes were shipped. It became clear that it had no use to prepare torpedoes in the Netherlands which were to be used in the Dutch East Indies. Instead cleaning and trimming was to be done in the Dutch East Indies. 

The Haitian navy according to the commanding officer of the Dutch screw steamship 1st class Koningin Emma der Nederlanden in 1887

Dutch Zr. Ms. Atjeh

Dutch Zr. Ms. Atjeh. Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original source

Dutch Zr. Ms. Koningin Emma der Nederlanden

The Dutch screw steamship 1st class Zr. Ms. Atjeh (1) commanded by captain C.H. Bogaert was in 1886 in the Dutch West Indies stationed until she was replaced by the screw steamship 1st class Koningin Emma der Nederland (2) on 14 February 1887. The next day departed the Atjeh towards the Netherlands. On 5 March 1887 anchored the Koningin Emma der Nederlanden in the roads of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Her salute of 21 gunshots was answered with a 17 gunshots salute, the maximum what the Haitian government did. Within short time arrived the adjutant of the Haitian admiral Robbert Cooper (3), who was a son of the American admiral Cooper. The adjutant reported that the admiralship of the Haitian navy, the Dessalines, which flying a vice-admirals flag, was not able to return a salute while she just was armed with 4 guns and the ram ship Toussaint Louverture (4) and the advice yacht in the inner roads had just one gun. The Dessalines never steamed while she had to stay in the reads of Port-au-Prince as escape possibility for the president. Both other two small ships could even not steam and had complete native crews including officers. The 7th arrived the British HMS Canada (5) captain L.A. Beaumont flying a vice-admirals flag coming from Barbados. On the 10th was Port-au-Prince left.

Notes
1. Also called frigate. Call sign GQCN. Laid down at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands on 3 March 1875, launched on 6 December 1876, commissioned on 1 November 1877, converted into a an accommodation ship at the shipyard De Lastdrager at Den Helder, Netherlands in 1906. Commissioned while replacing the Het Loo in 1908, also used as floating battery for salutes by replacing the 12cm by 7,5cm guns since 1910, further more used for training sailors of the Royal Naval Reserve at Willemsoord, Netherlands until 21 May 1921, decommissioned and since then used as accommodation ship for the air service at Willemsoord, Netherlands, disarmed until 1922, disarmed and stricken in 1929 and finally sold to the N.V. Frank Rijsdijk‘s industrieële onderneming at Hendrik Ido Ambacht, Netherlands for ƒ 23.501,00 to be broken up in May 1935.
2. Also called frigate, call sign GQMF, on stocks as De Ruyter at the naval yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands on 6 November 1876, completed for the half on 31 October 1876, renamed Koningin Emma der Nederlanden on 7 January 1879, launched on 20 January 1879, commissioned on 1 December 1881, decommissioned on 22 May 1896 for repairs, commissioned on 16 June 1897, decommissioned on23 June 1900, converted at the shipyard De Lastdrager at Den Helder, Netherlands into an accommodation ship in 1908, commissioned on 16 November 1908, guard ship at Willemsoord, Netherlands in 1920, captured by the German forces at Willemsoord on 14 May 1940, capsized and sunk at Den Helder in 1942, salvaged in April 1943 and scuttled north of Fort Harssens.
3. Rear admiral George H. Cooper (27 July 1821 USA New York-17 November 1891 Brooklyn, New York, USA) of the US Navy, served in the navy between 1836-1884.
4. Launched by the Societé des forges et Chantiers, France in 1886. His son Mason S. Cooper (1847Portsmouth, Virgiania, USA-2 January 1891, Brooklyn, New York, YSA) was admiral in the Haitian navy.
5. Comus-class screw steam corvette, laid down at the Portsmouth Dockyard, England in 1879, launched on 26 August 1881, completed in 1881, reserve since December 1896 and sold in 1897.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1886-1887.