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Thursday, 31 May 2018

What will happen with the Australian monitor HMAS Cerberus in the near future? Help to save her!


In Australia the hull of the monitor HMAS Cerberus still exists, sadly enough her future is threatened. There is a website of the Friends of the Cerberus with the clear intention of saving her. I asked John Toogood to supply more information what he did. See the text below. In the 19th Century was also the Royal Netherlands Navy interested in this ship. A Dutch naval officer received an order from the minister of navy to supply more details. He even made a sketch drawing of her. Why?, should someone ask. In that period was suggested in Dutch newspapers that Australia seemed to want her own colonial empire and the Dutch East Indies were nearby. Nonsense may be, but we have now a fine sketch of her. At the same time was the Roral Netherlands Navy interested in naval shipbuilding abroad especially for the pratical use of innovations. Let's hope that except for the sketch she herself also keeps existing as one of the few remaining 19th Century warships!

Cerberus in 2006. The entire ship and guns in the sea towards the bottom of the photo are visible. Photo with kind permission of Lindsay Stepanow. Source

The following have been used variously with Fb shares linking back to our primary FACEBOOK. which is a shared link to our main website’s 9 April ’18 news item.

Is this the 'last gasp' for Cerberus? Let's hope not!
Bayside Council recently lodged a formal application with Heritage Victoria to fill our former HMVS/HMAS Cerberus with concrete under the guise of Heritage preservation despite clearly being at odds with the "Burra Charter" which is accepted nationally as the standard for heritage conservation.

Monitor at Risk Down-under!
Cerberus is not an 'American' Civil War survivor but a British built forerunner of the next generation Monitors. Launched in 1868, the same decade as USS Monitor and H.L. Hunley, she now rests relatively intact (albeit tenuously) right where she was 'parked' in 1926 ... about 200 metres off-shore at a bay-side Melbourne (Australia) beach. Time is fast running out for supporters to make a submission opposing Bayside Council's application to fill the monitor, former HMVS/HMAS Cerberus with concrete. These must be in writing (hard-copy) mailed to Heritage Victoria as indicated by the original news item to arrive no later than 24 April '18. If you live outside Australia and wish to make a submission feel free to do so by email to “Friends of the Cerberus Inc.” making sure you allow a few days for us to print and forward by conventional mail on your behalf.
Hard-copy submissions are essential and required by Heritage Victoria no later than their stated deadline in order to be considered regarding the defeat of Bayside Council's permit application but emails may still be sent as well. They certainly won't do any harm, just make sure the snail-mail is sent to arrive in time.

All are urged to share this post on your timelines, any relevant Fb pages you manage and groups to which you belong. Every share, like and (favourable) comment helps to spread our message and encourage others to 'join the fray'. 

John Toogood FACEBOOKPOST share dated 11 April 2018:
This is a disgraceful prospect coming as it does during centenary celebrations and threatening the sole substantive remains of Australia's Great War Fleet (albeit in an auxiliary role), our only pre-federation war ship and the last of Victoria's colonial 'battle' fleet. If our responsible politicians and bureaucrats think that irreversibly filling Cerberus with concrete is a real preservation option and not simply what it appears to everyone else, a crass attempt to 'make it go away' whilst releasing heritage funds to mitigate local government risk, then clearly they have no right to claim heritage credentials and I for one will be carefully reviewing my life-long voting habits in the future.
Even if it is accepted that 'fill-and-forget' is currently the only short/medium term prospect there are far superior alternatives to concrete available that are affordable, reversible, environmentally neutral and won't increase the weight of Cerberus' footprint (4,000 tonnes of concrete is estimated to result in a net weight increase to the ship's sea-bed footprint of about 137% after allowing for water displacement).

This Fb post published by The heritage Network and shared widely during Feb-Mar of 2015 isn’t directly related to the current issue of stopping Bayside Council from filling the ship with concrete but nevertheless does provide some background.

The Heritage network Published by John Toogood·26 February 2015

HMAS (formerly HMVS) Cerberus:
As the Great War loomed, despite her already advanced age (launched 1868 - commissioned 1871 with the Victorian Colonial Navy) and with 43 years of service to three Australian Navies behind her, the Monitor Cerberus was 'drafted' and recommissioned as a Port Guard and Ammunition Store-Ship after being briefly decommissioned during the pre-war period. HMAS Cerberus is photographed here at her third mooring location, near the mouth of the Yarra River off Williamstown in Victoria's Hobson's Bay, circa 1914. After the war (in April 1921) she was re-named HMAS Platypus II and tasked as 'secondary tender' for the J-Class Submarine fleet based in Corio Bay.
Cerberus currently rests in 3 meters of water just 200 metres off-shore at Half Moon Bay where she was essentially run aground and scuttled to form a breakwater in 1926. The ship remains largely intact although a partial collapse of the lower hull during severe storms in 1993 has hastened its subsidence in the interim.

The 1860s Monitor, former HMVS/HMAS Cerberus is Australia's only warship from the pre-1918 era that has survived into the 21st century, albeit tenuously. As we plot a course through the Great War's (1914-18) centenary we bear witness to major projects from around the world undertaken by Countries with a commitment to restore their few surviving 1914-18 warships in time for significant anniversary celebrations. Not so however in 'the land of Oz' where successive Australian governments at all levels continue to procrastinate whilst their only such opportunity slips further away.
Image sourced from Friends of the Cerberus Inc.'s main website 
Courtesy of the "State Library of South Australia."

Bayside Council recently lodged a formal application with Heritage Victoria to fill our former HMVS/HMAS Cerberus with concrete under the guise of Heritage preservation despite clearly being at odds with the "Burra Charter" which is accepted nationally as the standard for heritage conservation. The current status of Cerberus, being included on Australia's "National Heritage List", doesn't seem to matter when bureaucratic antagonism and political indifference are allied against valid community concerns for our vanishing heritage. Our supporters can still help to convince Heritage Victoria that a positive heritage outcome remains an option only if they deny Bayside Council's application. Check out the following extract ("Submissions") from our recently published Newsletter 198. Help to 'scuttle' this destructive and unacceptable proposal. Send your individual protest as indicated, to Heritage Victoria by conventional (hard-copy) mail today and make sure you beat their 24 Apr '18 deadline. If lost for words feel free to copy and paste the form letter provided on our "HELP" page.
'Submissions.

Naturally we will be making a submission to Heritage Victoria. Anyone wishing to do likewise should be aware that submissions should be posted, and NOT emailed, to Heritage Victoria, PO Box 500, Melbourne 8002.

Any overseas supporters wishing to make submissions can email them to us via john.rogers@cerberus.com.au and we will post them to Heritage Victoria.

It cannot be emphasised enough that Heritage Victoria will decide later this month whether to fill Cerberus with concrete. All indications are that the application will be approved.
By my reckoning, 1,700 cubic metres of concrete will require over 200 concrete trucks to fill Cerberus. A horrifying thought. What a way to treat a place on the National Heritage List.'
Follow the link, read  Newsletter 198 in full and update yourself with Friends of the Cerberus' position regarding these latest developments.

Monday, 30 April 2018

Polish stern trawler TR-30 Cold War design


Dimensions 28,50 (waterline)-30,35 (over all) x 7,90 (moulded) x 4,10 (moulded depth) x 3,10 (moulded) metres, hold capacity 175 cubic metres, fuel bunker capacity 45 cubic metres/38 tons, fresh water bunker capacity 15 tons. Crew accommodation for 14 persons. Horsepower 850hp. Cruising range 15 days and speed 3 (bottom trawling with tower power of around 5,7 tons)-4 (pelagic trawling with towing power 5,2 tons)-11 knots. Designed for the bottom or pelagic fishing methods to a maximum depth of around 275 metres. 

Sunday, 29 April 2018

German general cargo ship Paula Anna 2012-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 2 April 2018

Cyprus-flagged, homeport Limassol, IMO 9507142, MMSI 212211000 and call sign 5BRM4. Earlier Antigua&Barnuda-flagged, homeport Saint John’s and MMSI 305863000. Owned and managed by Eicke Schiffahrt, Heide-Holst, Germany. Built by Bodewes Shipyard, Hoogezand, Netherlands in 2012. 

Saturday, 28 April 2018

Danish oil/chemical tanker Hafnia Soya 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 April 2018

Singapore-flagged, IMO 9729271, MMSI 566583000 and call sign 9V3282. Built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea as the Hyundai Mipo 2573 in 2015. Owned and managed by Hafnia Tankers, Hellerup, Denmark. 

Friday, 27 April 2018

German oil/chemical tanker Georg Essberger 2004-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 April 2018

Madeira/Portugal-flagged, IMO 9191175, MMSI 255735000 and call sign CQSW.
Built by Baltic Shipyard, St. Petersburg, Russia in 2004. Owned and managed by Essberger, Hamburg, Germany. 

Thursday, 26 April 2018

Italian tug (ex-Wolf 2006-2007, BB Ocean 2007-2015) Multratug 14 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 April 2018

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Terneuzen, Netherlands, IMO 9360594, MMSI 244850959 and call sign PBIJ. Gross tonnage 407 tons, net tonnage 149 tons and dimensions 31,59 (between perpendiculars)-34,50 (over all) x 11,60 (over all) x 6,50 (maximum) metres. Speed 13,9 knots. Bollard pull 75 tons. As the BB Ocean, Denmark International Register-flagged, homeport Copenhagen, MMSI 220535000 and owned and managed by Bukser&Bjerging, Oslo, Norway. Built by Astilleros Armon, Navia, Spain in 2006. Ex-Wolf of Ocean S.r.l, Trieste, Italy renamed June 2007 BB Ocean of Bjergning Danmark A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark chartered from Oceam S.r.l. and renamed Multatug 14 on 9 June 2015 chartered by Multarship B.V., Terneuzen from Ocean s.r.l. 

Wednesday, 25 April 2018

Saudi Arabian ro-ro cargo ship Bahri Jazan 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 April 2018

Saudi Arabia-flagged, homeport Dammam, IMO 9620970, MMSI 403533001 and call sign HZFI. Owned by NSCSA. Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and managed by Mideast Shipmanagement, Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2013. 

Tuesday, 24 April 2018

Dutch LPG tanker Sundowner 2016-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 April 2018

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Rotterdam, Netherlands, IMO 9715713, MMSI 244830182 and call sign PCTK. Built by Shipyard Constructions Hoogezand, Hoogezand, Netherlands in 2016. Owned and managed by Chemgas Shipping, Rotterdam, Netherlands. 

Monday, 23 April 2018

Dutch oil/chemical tanker (ex-Brovig Levanto 2011) Stolt Redshank 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 April 2018

United Kingdom-flagged, IMO 9566746, MMSI 235089046 and call sign 2EXV5. Ex-Brovig Levanto renamed September 2011. Owned and managed by Stolt Tankers, Rotterdam, Netherlands. Built by Chongqing Chuandong Shipbuilding Industry, Fuling, China in 2011. 

Sunday, 22 April 2018

Chinese container ship MSC Lily 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15-4-2018

Panama-flagged, IMO 9704960, MMSI 373134000 and call sign 3FVB9.
Built by New Times Shipbuilding, Jinghiang, China as the New Times 0208801 in 2015. Owned and managed by China International Marine Containers Group, Shenzen, China. 

Dutch mooring barge Meer III 1955-

Part of the fleet of the Afdeling Scheepvaart. Horsepower 20 hp. Expected 1955 . Stationed at Manokwari, Netherlands New Guinea.

Source
Dutch Parliament session 1954-1955. Budget Netherlands New Guinea 1953-1954. Memory of response. Attachment No. 14. 

Dutch Holland launch Siriwo 1952-

Part of the fleet of the Afdeling Scheepvaart. Horsepower 20 hp. Commissioned on 30 May 1952. Stationed at Soring, Netherlands New Guinea.

Source
Dutch Parliament session 1954-1955. Budget Netherlands New Guinea 1953-1954. Memory of response. Attachment No. 14. 

Dutch Holland launch Waipaga 1952-

Part of the fleet of the Afdeling Scheepvaart. Horsepower 20 hp. Commissioned on 1 June 1952 . Stationed at Hollandia, Netherlands New Guinea.

Source
Dutch Parliament session 1954-1955. Budget Netherlands New Guinea 1953-1954. Memory of response. Attachment No. 14. 

Belgian LPG tanker Kontich 2016-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15-4-2018

Belgium-flagged, IMO 9687502, MMSI 205691000 and call sign ONIP. Owned and managed by Exmar, Antwerp, Belgium. Built by Hanjin Subic Shipyard, Olonpago, Philippines as HHIC PHIL 102 in 2016.

Dutch built trawler Aneta (IJM 82) sold within the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 4 November 1932

An item reported that the Dutch steel built trawler Aneta (IJM 82) of 304,38 gross register tons and built by I. Friedrichs&Co., A.G., Einswarden, Germany in 1916 was sold by the N.V. Visscherij Mij. Aneta (in liquidation), Ijmuiden, Netherlands to C.J.A. Molenaars, Haarlem, Netherlands. 

Dutch built floating sheerleg Sapowa towards France according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 4 December 1931

An item reported that the Scheepswerf Gebr. Van der Werf, Deest, Netherlands delivered the floating sheerleg Sapowa towards France. Dimensions 25 x 11,80 x 2,60 metres. Lifting capacity 50 ton, maximum lifting height around 16 metres and a range of 9,50 metres. Steam delivered by a steam boiler with 38 square metres heating surface for main sheerleg winch and 4 mooring winches. Water ballast capacity 95 tons. 

French privateer of Dunkirk la Fortune 1713

Commanding officer Aldert Janssen. Measurement 8 tons, armament of 2 swivels and a crew numbering 26 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer chaloupe of Dunkirk la Fortune 1705

Commanding officer Jacques Issouard.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer of Dunkirk la S. Barbe 1711

Commanding officer Georges Huart-Dornucourt. Measurement 40 tons, armament of 4 guns, 2 swivels and a crew numbering 36 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

Saturday, 21 April 2018

British high speed craft Valkyrie

In the locks towards the Schelde river, Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 April 2018

United Kingdom-flagged, MMSI 235069806 and call sign 2BWA9. Part of the Valkyrie Diving & Marine Services Limited, Shoreham-by-Sea, England. 

German general cargo ship (ex-Alcmene 2009, Aphrodite 2009-2010, Botany Sea 2010-2011, Aphodrite 2011) Salta 2011-

Schelde of Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 April 2018

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, Liberia, IMO 9419242, MMSI 636092067 and call sign A8WC6. Ex-Alcemene renamed December 2009, Aphodrite renamed September 2010, Botany Sea renamed January 2011 and Aphrodite renamed December 2011. Owned and managed by NSC Holding, Hamburg, Germany. Built by Wuzhiu Ship Repairing&Building, Zhoushan, China in 2008. 

Yugoslavia wanted to built nuclear propelled tankers according to the Dutch newspaper Amigoe di Curacao dated 14 November 1957

An item reported that a shipyard at Rijeka, Yugoslavia [nowadays Croatia] and two engine plants founded a commission to study the possibilities of building 40.000-50.000 ton nuclear propelled tankers. 

Dutch tug Andre-B 2008-


Inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 April 2018

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9451252, MMSI 245188000 and call sign PHON. Completed in April 2008 by Gebr. Kooiman, Zwijndrecht/Dordrecht, Netherlands with yard number 178. Gross tonnage 254 tons, deadweight 63 tons and as dimensions 31,10 x 9,50 x 3,60-4,00 metres. Bollard pull 50 tons. Horsepower 3.400hp. Bowthruster 450hp. Crew numbers 4 persons and accommodation for 8 persons. Owned and managed by BMS. 

Dutch bark Noach VI underway from the Netherlands towards the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 26 August 1889

An item dated 24 August reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies of the Dutch bark Noach VI underway from Rotterdam, Netherlands towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Call sign PMWR, homeport Rotterdam, Netherlands and net capacity 3.780,17 cubic metres/1.334,39 ton of 2,83 cubic metres.  

Dutch screw steamship Noord-Holland underway from the Dutch East Indies towards the Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 24 August 1889

An item dated 24th reported the departure from Batavia, Dutch East Indies by the Dutch screw steamship Noord-Holland master Sprang van Lee towards Marseille, France and Rotterdam, Netherlands.(1)

Note
1. Call sign PNBR, homeport Rotterdam, Netherlands, horsepower 220hp and net capacity 50.55,56 cubic metres/1.784,61 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

Dutch East Indies schooner Henriette cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 24 August 1889

An item dated 24th reported the departure from Batavia, Dutch East Indies by the Dutch East Indies schooner Henriette towards the east.(1)

Note
1. Call sign TDQF, homeport Pati (Japara), Dutch East Indies and net capacity 124,97 cubic metres/44,16 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

Dutch East Indies bark Anoear Salim cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 24 August 1889

An item dated 24th reported the departure from Batavia, Dutch East Indies by the Dutch East Indies bark Anoear Salim master Baserawie towards Banka, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Call sign TBKQ,homeport Palembang, Dutch East Indies and net capacity 523,60 cubic metres/185,01 tons of 2,83 cubic metres.  

British car carrier Torino 2009-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 14 April 2018

United Kingdom-flagged, homeport Southampton, IMO 9398321, MMSI 235070707 and call sign 2BZH7. Built by MHI Nagasaki Shipyard&Engine Works, Nagasaki, Japan in 2009. Owned and managed by Wilhelmsen Lines Car Carriers, Southampton, United Kingdom. 

Dutch towing launch Japen 1952-

Part of the fleet of the Afdeling Scheepvaart. Horsepower 40 hp. Commissioned on 30 May 1952. Stationed at Kepi, Netherlands New Guinea.

Source
Dutch Parliament session 1954-1955. Budget Netherlands New Guinea 1953-1954. Memory of response. Attachment No. 14. 

Dutch towing launch Sagewin 1952-

Part of the fleet of the Afdeling Scheepvaart. Horsepower 40 hp. Commissioned on 22 November 1952. Stationed at Kokonao, Netherlands New Guinea.

Source
Dutch Parliament session 1954-1955. Budget Netherlands New Guinea 1953-1954. Memory of response. Attachment No. 14. 

Dutch ferry Vogelkop 1955-

Part of the fleet of the Afdeling Scheepvaart. Horsepower  hp. Expected in 1955 . Stationed at Sorong, Netherlands New Guinea.

Source
Dutch Parliament session 1954-1955. Budget Netherlands New Guinea 1953-1954. Memory of response. Attachment No. 14.

British nuclear propelled cargo submarine designed according to the Dutch newspaper Friese koerier dated 14 August 1958

Source Gereformeerd gezinsblad dated 29 March 1961

An item reported that the British firm Mitchell Engineering, London, England designed a 80.000 tons nuclear propelled cargo submarine and ordered the Sanders Roe Factories to make a pilot study. For that pilot study was 8 months estimated and if the conclusion was positive would a British shipyard get an order. The designed speed was 35 knots. The intention was to use her as a ore cargo ship on the line Hudson Bay-England and pass the North Pole while submerged. The Suez Canal was not to be used. The preparations and eventual building were private matter while the British cabinet was not interested. Another Dutch newspaper Gereformeerd gezinsblad dated 29 March 1963 referred to this plan of Mitchell and published a sketch of such cargo submarine with a tonnage of 50.000 tons, net cargo capacity 28.000 tons and a length of around 200 metres. She was to be continuously submerged and only to come to the surface for loading or unloading her cargo which was to consist of iron ore and oil.

Friday, 20 April 2018

Luxembourgian trailing suction hopper dredger Mellina 2003-





Middelburg, Netherlands 19 April 2018

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Vlissingen, Netherlands, IMO 9260689, MMSI 245820000 and call sign PBIM. Built by IHC Beaver Dredgers, Sliedrecht, Netherlands in 2003. Owned by Dredging International Luxembourg, Luxembourg and managed by Tideway, Breda, Netherlands.

Chinese container ship OOCL Asia 2006-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 April 2018

Hong Kong/China-flagged, homeport Hong Koing, IMO 9300790, MMSI 477105600 and call sign VRBQ6. Owned and managed by OOCL, Hong Kong, China. Built by Samsung Shipbuilding&Heavy Industries, Geoje, South Korea in 2006. 

Greek bulk carrier (ex-Eternal Spirit 1996-2003) Chrysoula S 2003-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 April 2018

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, IMO 9141998, MMSI 636017167 and call sign D5JP6. Ex-Eternal Spirit renamed April 2003. Owned and managed by Order Shipping, Athens, Greece. Built by Imabari Shipbuilding Marugame Yard, Marugame, Japan in 1996. 

Argentina ordered building floating dry dock in England according to the magazine Mitteilungen aus dem Gebiete des Seewesens dated 1913 No. 3

An item reported that the Argentinean cabinet intended to sign on short notice a contract with the British firm Vickers for delivery within 9 months at Buenos Aires a floating dry dock for submarines and smaller vessels. The dock was designed by Clark and Standfield, Westminster, England had as dimensions 91,4 x 13,7 (available width for docking ships)-18,3 metres. It had to be possible to dock vessels with a maximum draught of 4.9 metres. Lifting capacity 1.500 tons.  

Torpedo type XIIb used by the Royal Netherlands Navy according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1935 no. 2

Total length including pistol 5,04 metres, diameter 45 centimetres, total weight 558 kilo, type pistol 4th, bursting charge type guncotton and weight 50-90kg, maximum depth adjustment 6 metres, content air chamber 342 litres, weight air 36,53 kilo, no heated air, no water injection. speed short distance 25-33 miles and long distance around 22 miles. 

German battleship SMS Baden rammed German battleship SMS Wittelsbach according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1902-1903 no. 8

Bayern-class

Wittelsbach-class

An item referred to the Mittheilungen aus dem Gebiete des Seewesens reporting that when the German battleship Baden left the yard at Wilhelmshaven, Germany, due to the heavy wind she rammed the Wittelsbach causing a hole of 1,5cm in the hull of the latter ship. In the accident was also a watertight bulkhead damaged and after immediately efforts to stop the leaking was the Wittelsbach dry docked.

Notes
1. Of the Bayern-class battleships, designed between 1910-1912, consisted of the Bayern, Baden, Sachsen and Württemberg, preceded by the König-class and was to be succeeded by the never realized L20a-class. Built under the Naval Law of 1912. Laid down as the Ersatz Wörth at Schichau-Werke, Danzig with yard number 913 in December 1913, launched on 30 October 1915, commissioned on 14 March 1917, beached in Gutter Sound, Scapa Flow, Orkney Islands on 21 June 1919 and sunk as a target on 16 August 1921. Building costs 49 million Goldmarks.
2. Building ordered under the contract name ‘C’, laid down at the Kaiserliche Werft Wilhelmshaven, Germany with yard number 25 in September 1899, launched on 3 July 1900, commissioned on 15 October 1902, completed in the second half of 1902, since 1916 used for auxiliary purposes, minesweepers tender since 1919, stricken in July 1921 and sold to be broken up. Of the Wittelsbach-class battleships built under the Naval Law of 1898, consisting of the Wittelsbach, Wettin, Zähringen, Schwaben and Mecklenburg precedent by the Kaiser Friederich III-class and succeeded by the Braunschweig-class. 

British steamship Maid of Patras sold to the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 23 October 1931

An item reported that the British steamship Maid of Patras of 288 gross register tons and built by Irvine’s Shipbuilding Company, West-Hartlepool, England in 1905 was sold by the Byron Steamship Co. Ltd., London, England for 1.400 pound sterling to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Dutch steam trawler St. Theresia (IJM17) sold within the Netherlands and renamed Bonne (K2) according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 23 October 1931

An item reported that the Dutch steam trawler St. Theresia (IJM17) of 83,34 gross register tons and built by Goabtree Co. Ltd., Great Yarmouth, England in 1908 was sold by the N.V. Visscherij Mij. St. Theresia, IJmiden, Netherlands to L. Kammer and A. Ras, Urk, Netherlands and commissioned as the Bonne (K2). 

Dutch steam trawler Irene (IJM89) sold within the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 23 October 1931

An item reported that the Dutch steam trawler Irene (IJM89) of 183,39 gross register tons and built by the Earle’s Company Limited, Hull, England n 1899 was sold by the Maatschappij De Nijverheid, IJmuiden, Netherlands to H, Wijker, IJmuiden. 

Dutch steel dredger Kaliwaal 21 built at Hardinxveld, Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 23 October 1931

An item reported that the Dutch steel dredger Kaliwaal 21 with as dimensions 35 x 7 x 2,70 metres was launched by the Scheepsbouwwerf en Machinefabriek Holland, Hardinxveld, Netherlands. 

Chinese car carrier MSC Christiana 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 10 April 2018

Panama-flagged, IMO 9453298, MMSI 371715000 and call sign 3FJT7. Owned and managed by MSC Shipmanagement Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Built by STX Dalian Shipbuilding, Dalian, China in 2011. 

Dutch double screw Holland launch Walingen 1955-

Part of the fleet of the Afdeling Scheepvaart. Horsepower 40 hp. Expected in 1955. Reserve. Stationed at Inanwatan, Netherlands New Guinea.

Source
Dutch Parliament session 1954-1955. Budget Netherlands New Guinea 1953-1954. Memory of response. Attachment No. 14. 

Dutch double screw Holland launch Garnaal 1955

Part of the fleet of the Afdeling Scheepvaart. Horsepower 40 hp. Excpeted in 1955 . Stationed at Kaimana, Netherlands New Guinea.

Source
Dutch Parliament session 1954-1955. Budget Netherlands New Guinea 1953-1954. Memory of response. Attachment No. 14. 

Dutch double screw Holland launch Zeehaen 1954

Part of the fleet of the Afdeling Scheepvaart. Horsepower 40 hp. Expected at the end of 1954. Stationed at Wasior, Netherlands New Guinea.

Source
Dutch Parliament session 1954-1955. Budget Netherlands New Guinea 1953-1954. Memory of response. Attachment No. 14. 

Dutch double screw Holland launch Heemskerck 1954

Part of the fleet of the Afdeling Scheepvaart. Horsepower 40 hp. Expected at the end of 1954. Stationed at Waren, Netherlands New Guinea.

Source
Dutch Parliament session 1954-1955. Budget Netherlands New Guinea 1953-1954. Memory of response. Attachment No. 14. 

Thursday, 19 April 2018

Dutch pipe burying vessel Flintstone 2011-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 April 2018

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Vlissingen, Netherlands, IMO 9528433, MMSI 245861000 and call sign PBZD. Built at the Sembawang Shipyard, Singapore in 2011. Owned and managed by Tideway, Breda, Netherlands.

Uruguayan cruiser Dogali wrecked according to the magazine Mitteilungen aus dem Gebiete des Seewesens dated 1913 No. 1

An item reported that the Uruguayan cruiser Dogali bought in the past from the Italian navy and renamed Montevideo was wrecked underway towards Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on the coast of Rio Grande. Her crew was rescued the ship however considered to be lost. Displacement 2.088 tons and with an armament of 2-15cm guns, 9-5,7cm guns, 2-3,7cm guns and 2 torpedo tubes. Speed 19 knots.(1)

Note
1. Laid down by Armstrong, Elswick, England on 13 February 1885 for the Greek navy and to be named Salamis, launched on 23 December 1885, sold before completion to Italy, commissioned as the Dogali on 28 April 1887, sold to Uruguay in January 1908, renamed 25 de Agosto, commissioned in 28 April 1887, renamed Montevideo in1910, decommissioned in 1914 and sold to be broken up in 1932. 

Dry dock for Puerto Cabello, Venezuela to be built in the USA according to the magazine Mitteilungen aus dem Gebiete des Seewesens dated 1912

An item reported that the building of a steel made dry dock for Puerto Cabello, Venezuela was to be built in the USA. In the spring was the dock with as building costs 250.000 dollars ordered. Length 86 metres and able to lift ships with a maximum displacement of 3.000 tons. 

Russian protected cruiser Askold built larger for coal more bunker capacity according to the magazine Mitteilungen aus dem Gebiete des Seewesens dated 1905 no. 5

Askold

An item reported that the original projected displacement of the Russian cruiser Askold was increased from 6.500 to 7.962 tons.(1)  The increase was used not for fitting her out with an armour belt but for enlarging the coal bunker capacity. The decision for this choice was made while she was to be used in the Far East and needed a sufficient range just like new to be built warships. For example was the coal bunker capacity of the Peresvjet as newest ship and comparable qua size with the British HMS Renown considerable larger as earlier ships.

Note
1. Protected cruiser. Laid down by Germaniawerft, Kiel, Germany on 8 June 1899, launched on 2 March 1900, commissioned on 25 January 1902 and broken up in 1922. 

Greece wanted to sell several warships according to the magazine Mitteilungen aus dem Gebiete des Seewesens dated 1905 no. 1

An item reported that Greece wanted to sell the steam transport Mykale, the steamboats Pyreus and Patras and the sail goelette Aura on an auction for a total minimum price of 133.000 drachmes. 

German container ship Cape Manilla 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 April 2018

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9571313, MMSI 538004412 and call sign V7WW8. Owned and managed by Columbia Shipmanagement Deutschland, Hamburg, Germany. Built by Wenchong Shipyard, Guagzhou, China in 2011. 

Dutch concern Verolmes Verenigde Scheepswerven studying building nuclear propeller tanker according to the Dutch newspaper Het vrije volk dated 7 September 1957

An item reported that the Dutch concern Verolmes Verenigde Scheepswerven started with studying the construction of a nuclear propelled tanker. Experts of the firm Scheepsinstallatiebedrijf Nederland, IJsselmonde, Netherlands would execute this study. Shipyard director C. Verolme stated that they would not directly start with building such a ship but to be prepared if there was an building order acquired. 

Norwegian shipping companies and banks interested in building nuclear propelled tanker according to the Dutch newspaper De Tijd dated 1 February 1957

An item reported that Norwegian banks and shipping companies contacted the Dutch-Norwegian Centre for Nuclear Research at Kjeller, Norway with the intention of founding a Norwegian company for using nuclear energy for industrial purposes. This company named Noratom already planned the building of a 100.000 tons nuclear propelled tanker.

Norwegians and Dutch interested in building nuclear propelled tanker according to the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf dated 5 July 1956

An item referred to the Norwegian plans for building a nuclear propelled 32.000 tons tanker with a speed of 18 knots to be built by the Rosenberg’s Shipyard, Stavanger, Norway. The Dutch engineer ir. E. Jansen of the study group of the Dutch-Norwegian Centre for Nuclear Research at Kjeller, Norway confirmed this.

Norwegian shipping companies interested in building nuclear propelled tanker according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwsblad van het Noorden dated 1 February 1967

An item reported that six if the major Norwegian shipping companies considered founding a consortium for financing a giant nuclear propelled tanker which could be launched in 1963.

Wednesday, 18 April 2018

British mine countermeasure vessel HMS Cattistock (M31) 1979-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 2 April 2018

United Kingdom-flagged, homeport HMNB Portsmouth and MMSI 276742000.
Part of the Hunt-class minehunters. Building ordered on 29 January 1979, laid down by Vosper Thornycroft, United Kingdom on 29 June 1979, launched on 22 January 1991 and commissioned on 5 March 1982. Displacement 750 tons and as dimensions 60 x 9,8 x 2,2 metres or 196.10 x 32.2 x 7.3 feet. Machinery consisted of 2 shaft Napier Deltic diesels supplying 3.540shp allowing a speed of 15-17 knots. Crew numbers 45 persons (including 6 officers). Armament consists of 1-3m DS30M Mks gun, 2 mini guns and 3 general purpose machineguns. 

Belgian motor trawler Hans Memling (O295) built in the Netehrlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 23 October 1931

An item reported that the steel motor trawler Hans Memling (O295) was launched at the shipyards ‘s Lands Welvaren, I.S. Figee, Vlaardingen, Netherlands for account of the N.V. Motorvisscherij, Ostende, Belgium. 

French steel motor tug Turquise delivered to owner according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 9 October 1931

An item reported that after a successful trial the French steel motor tug Turquise was delivered to her owner. Built by Scheepsbouwwerf De Hoop, Hardinxveld, Netherlands. Fitted out with a 150.180hp Dentz diesel engine. Dimensions 16,30 x 4 x 2 metres. 

Dutch steam tug Haifa delivered to owner according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 25 September 1931

An item reported that the Dutch steam tug Haifa after a successful trials was delivered to J. Verheul, Rotterdam, Netherlands and departed towards the harbour work at Haifa, Palestina. Built by the shipyard of Gebr. De Korte, Moerdijk, Netherlands. Gross register tonnage 54,64 tons and as dimensions 19,82 x 4,80 x 2,30 metres. Fitted out with 1-200ihp triple expansion steam engine and 1 boiler with a heating surface of 71 square metres and pressure of 15 atmosphere built by the N.V. Vlaardingsche Machinefabriek I.A. Kreber, Vlaardingen, Netherlands. 

French transport Vinh Long grounded off Singapore according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 27 March 1901


An item reported that the French transport Vinh Long (1) which grounded on a coral reef before the harbour of Singapore was lucky enough apparently her hull not damaged. She had on board 450 men French troops destined towards Takoe [Taku, China].(2)

Notes
1. Iron built screw steamship of 5.350 gross register tons built at Chaigneau et Bichon, Bordeaux, France in 1881 as troop transport for shipping military to the French military. Served in the First World War as hospital ship and since 1918 again as troop transport. When a fire broke out finally blown up when the magazines exploded on 16 November 1922 in the Sea of Marmora, Turkey. Dimensions 105 x 15,4 x 6,7 metres.
2. She visited according to the Dutch Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1900-1901 Sabang, Dutch East Indies between 17-18 July 1900. 

Chilean training ship General Baquedano visited Tandjong-Priok, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper De Preanger-bode dated 29 November 1900


The Engineer dated 8 September 1899

An item reported that at Tandjong-Priok, Dutch East Indies the Chilean school ship General Baquedano was expected to arrive about just a few days. She arrived at Singapore on 19th November coming from Hong Kong. The British newspaper Straits Times warned in the meantime the authorities at Singapore to keep the control while the Chilean crew of 316 men seemed to be quiet unhinged in the Chinese harbour. Measurement 2.500 tons and an armament of 10 guns. Another Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 28th November reported her arrival coming from Singapore with as commanding officer Wilson.

Notes
1. Launched by Armstrong Whitworth, England in 5 July 1898, commissioned on 22 August 1899, refitted at Talcahuano 1922-1926, training ship until 1935, decommissioned on 15 December 1959. Also known as La Chancha or La Baquedano. Displacement 2.500 tons and as dimensions 277 x 45.9 (extreme) x 25.2 (depth) x 18 (mean draught) feet. Barque-rigged with a sail area of around17.500 square feet. Speed 13,75 knots. Horsepower 1.500hp supplied by vertical triple expansion engines of Messrs. Hawthorn, Leslie and Co. and 4 Belleville water tube boilers. Armament consisted of 2-7,6cm guns, 2-5,7cm guns and 2 machineguns; in 1898 mentioned 4-4.7” guns, 2-12-ld guns, 2-6pd guns, 2 Maximum machineguns and 1-18” torpedo tube.
2. She visited according to the Dutch Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1900-1901 Tandjong-Priok, Dutch East Indies between 27 November-1 December 1900. 

British tug Afon Goch 1997-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 April 2018

Outer harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 April 2018


Inner harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 April 2018

United Kingdom-flagged, IMO 9150781, MMSI 232002785 and call sign MWIP7. Built by Hepworth Shipyard, Kingston upon Hall, United Kingdom in 1997. Gross register tonnage 129,3 tons, deadweight 123 tons and as dimensions 23,8 (over all) x 7,5 x 3,25 (depth) x 2 (draught) metres. Machinery consisted of 2 Caterpillar 3412 D.I.T.A. engines with a total horsepower of 1.450bhp at 1.800 rpm. Bollard pull 19 tons, Speed 11,1 (free running) knots. Owned and managed by Holyhead Towing Company Limited. 

Danish interested in building nuclear propelled tankers according to the Dutch newspaper Het vrije volk dated 2 July 1960

An item reported that the Danish organisation Danatom published a report describing 3 large tankers including one nuclear propelled. Starting point was to design a tanker for the oil transport between the Persian Gulf and England with a deadweight of 65.000 tons a horsepower of 27.500hp. The results were a tanker with a displacement of 88.000 tons and as dimensions 240 x 35 metres in the versions oil fuelled boilers and steam engine, diesel engine and nuclear. The building costs and service costs of a nuclear propelled ship were 20-30% higher as for a standard ship. The cargo capacity of a nuclear ship with 62.000 tons was more than the 59.000 of her standard opponent. The weights of the needed machinery showed huge differences varying form 155 ton for a turbine ship increasing to 1.850 ton for a motor ship and 3.355 tons for a nuclear ship. The kern reactor was to be of the pressurized water type with 6 heat exchangers and the engine room to be remote controlled from a central position with the kern reactor in the aft ship. Accommodation for the crew was amidships. If the nuclear design was realized was unknown. 

Italian Fiat concern and Ansaldo Shipyards interested in building nuclear propelled tanker according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuw Guinea koerier dated 25 April 1961

An item reported that the Fiat-concern and the Government owned Ansaldo shipyards at Genoa, Italy signed a contract with the Italian commission for nuclear energy for developing a nuclear propelled tanker within 2 years. Fiat was to produce the kern reactor and the shipyards to design and built the ship. The European organisation Euratom (European Atomic Energy Community) was asked for financial support.

Italian Fiat concern and Ansaldo Shipyards interested in building nuclear propelled tanker according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 18 June 1958

An item referred to a statement of the director of the Italian Fiat-concern that Fiat was negotiating with the Italian Ansaldo shipyard the building of a 70.000 nuclear propelled tanker. The ship was to be fitted out with 1-32.000hp American Westinghouse reactor. A final date was not supplied but the hope was that Italy would be the first country realizing a nuclear propelled tanker.

British interested in building nuclear propelled tanker according to the Dutch newspaper De Volkskrant dated 11 March 1967

An item dated London, England 10th reported that the first to be built British nuclear propelled merchant ship would be a 80.000 tons tanker. With estimated building costs of 110 million Dutch guilders was it to be commissioned between 1961-1964. Two types of reactors based on the nuclear fission principle of the Calder Hall nuclear station were to be tested on land. 

Tuesday, 17 April 2018

British patrol vessel HMS Ranger (P293) 1987-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 2 April 2018

An Archer-class patrol and (cadet) training vessel, based in HMNB Portsmouth. Affiliated to Sussex and Brighton Universities’ Royal Naval Unit. MMSI 232696000 and call sign GAAY. Built at the shipyard of Watercraft Limited [Vosper Thornycroft], Shoreham-by-Sea in 1987 and commissioned in 1988. Displacement 54 tonnes and as dimensions 20,8 x 5,8 x 1,8 metres. Speed 14 knots. A crew numbering 12 (operational)-18 (training) persons. Her armament consists of 1-2cm Oerlikon gun if necessary and furthermore 3 machineguns.

Dutch bark Oostenburg arrived in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 29 August 1889

An item dated 29th reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies of the Dutch bark Oostenburg coming from Shield, England towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Call sign PNKM, homeport Amsterdam, Netherlands and net capacity 2.853,77 cubic metres/1.007,37 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

Dutch bark Noach VI arrived in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 29 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 28th reported the arrival of the Dutch bark Noach VI master Kruijt coming from Rotterdam, Netherlands, shipping agents J. Daendels&Co.(1)

Note
1. Call sign PMWR, homeport Rotterdam, Netherlands and net capacity 3.780,17 cubic metres /1.334,39 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

Dutch East Indies schooner Wadeatoel Barie cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 29 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 28th reported the arrival of the Dutch East Indies schooner Wadeatoel Barie master Sech Salim Drahim coming from Surabaya, Dutch East Indies. 

Dutch screw steamship Noord-Braband arrived in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 29 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 29th reported the arrival of the Dutch screw steamship Noord-Braband master Mets coming from Rotterdam, Netherlands and Padang, Dutch East Indies, shipping agents Rotterdamsche Lloyd.

Note
1. Net capacity 5.055,56 cubic metres/1.784,61 tons of 2,83 cubic metres, homeport Rotterdam, Netherlands and call sign PNBF. 

Dutch East Indies schooner Noer cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 29 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 29th reported the departure of the Dutch East Indies schooner Noer master Said Sech Barfid towards Samarang, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Similar to the schooner Noor, homeport Palembang, call sign TGSH and net capacity 257,77 cubic metres/91,08 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

Dutch offshore construction jack up Innovation 2012-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 April 2018

Germany-flagged, homeport Bremen, IMO 9603453, MMSI 218781000 and call sign DHUR2. Built by Crist, Gdansk, Poland in 2012. Owned by HGO Innovation Shipping, Schiedam, Netherlands and managed by HGO Infrasea Solutions, Bremen, Germany. Dimensions 147,50 (boomrest) x 42,00 (beam) x 11,00 (depth) x 7,33 (draft with thrusters) metres. Accommodation for 100 persons. Deadweight 11.166 tons and gross tonnage 22.313 tons.

Dutch steel motor tug Leo II handed over to owner according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 4 December 1931

An item reported that the Dutch steel motor tug Leo II was delivered after a successful trial by the Werf Voorwaarts, West-Graftdijk, Netherlands to L. van der Veen, Lemmer, Netherlands. Fitted out with a 135/150hp Bolnes diesel motor without compressor. 

Dutch tug Independent successful executing trials according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 25 September 1931

An item reported that the Dutch steel built tug Independent with success executed her trial. Built by the N.V. Scheepsbouw en Gashouderbouw v.h Jonker&Stans, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands for account of the N.V. Onafhankelijke Sleepdienst, Rotterdam, Netherlands. Gross register tonnage 84 tons and as dimensions 25 x 5,80 x 2,80 metres. Fitted out with a 430 ihp machinery and boiler manufactured by the N.V. Bolnes v/h J.H. van Capellen, Bolnes, Netherlands. 

Dutch steam trawler Jeane (IJM107) sold within the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 11 September 1931

An item reported that the Dutch iron built steam trawler Jeane (IJM107) of 157, 37 gross register tons and built by J.P. Rennoldson Sons, South-Shields, England in 1892 was sold by the N.V. Stoomvisscherij Maatschappij Klaverbank, Ijmuiden, Netherlands for ƒ 18.4000 towards Gebr. Hof, Ijmuiden.(1)

Note
1. The Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 22 August 1931 reported that she was sold on the public auction at Ijmuiden a day earlier for ƒ 18.400 to J.J. Baart, Ijmuiden. 

Dutch steam trawler Amstelstroom (IJM91) sold within the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 11 September 1931

An item reported that the Dutch steel steam trawler Amstelstroom (IJM91) of 166,65 gross register tons and built by Howthorn&Co., Leith, Scotland in 1905 was sold by the Visscherij Maatschappij Frisia, Ijmuiden, Netherlands for ƒ 15.000 towards the firm Parlevliet, Katwijk aan Zee, Netherlands.(1)

Note
1. The Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 22 August 1931 reported that she was sold on the public auction at Ijmuiden a day earlier for ƒ 1580400 to J.J. Steinmetz and others,Amsterdam, Netherlands and she was earlier property of the N,V, Visscherij Maatschappij Amsltelstroom, Ijmuiden and built at Glasgow, Scotland in 1903. 

Danish navy officer appointed as minister of the Royal Siamese navy according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag dated 14 December 1901

An item reported that the king of Siam appointed the Danish navy officer and member of the famous French the Duke De Richelieu as minister of navy and supreme commander of the navy of Siam. Usually was a brother of the king appointed on this post and it was considered to be prove that the king was against anti-foreign feelings.(1)

Note
1. Andreas du Plessis de Richelieu (24 February 1852 Loejt Kirkeby,Denmark-25 March 1932, Hørsholm, Denmark), in service as minister between 16 January 1900 and 29 January 1901 although already in 1875 appointed as officer in this navy. The relations with the family of the French cardinal seemed to be doubtful. 

38cm/15” Whitehead training torpedo M 1876

Military Museum Sofia, Bulgaria

For training purposed and used in the Bulgarian navy since 1900. The Bulgarian cruiser Nadezhda (1) was between 1900-1912 fitted out with 5 of such torpedoes. Manufactured by the Whitehead plant at Fiume, Austro-Hungaria [nowadays Rijeka, Croatia]. Total weight 350 kilo, fillers weight 25 kg, length 5,73 metres, speed 18-20 knots, deviation to 60 centimetres and range 500 (effective)-1,2 kilometres.

Note
1. In fact a torpedo gunboat or torpedo cruiser, ordered in 1897, launched by Chantiers et Ateliers de la Gironde, Bordeaux, France on 10 September 1898, commissioned in October 1898, ran aground in 1912 but salvaged and repaired, disarmed in the First Balkan War due to the her worst condition, rearmed but again disarmed in 1915, brought to Sevastopol, Russia [nowadays Russia/Ukraine] for repairs on 16 September 1918, most of her crew sent back to Bulgaria, abandoned at Sevastopol in December 1918, used by the Russian White Caspian Sea forces until 1920, in Bolshevik hands since 1921 and finally broken up in the end of the 1920s. Displacement 715 tons and as dimensions 67 x 8,3 x 3,1 metres or 220 x 27 x 10 feet. Machinery consisted of 2 triple expansion steam engine and 4 boilers delivering 2.600-3.100 hp allowing a speed of 18 knots. Her crew numbered 97 men. Armament consisted of 2-10cm/3.9” naval guns, 2-6,5cm/2.55” naval guns, 2-4,7cm/1.85” naval guns and 2-3,81cm/15” torpedo tubes. 

Royal Netherlands Navy could have had Thornycroft built Weapon-class destroyers in 1945-1946

In his letter dated 18 October 1945 informed the Dutch naval liaison officer at London, United Kingdom the Dutch minister of Navy that he was visited by major R.R. Seward who was an official representative of the British firm John I. Thornycroft&Co. Ltd. Seward informed him that the firm had 6 Weapon-class destroyers under construction for the British Royal Navy of which two were cancelled by the British Royal Navy.(1) The British |Admiralty however suggested the firm to approach the Royal Netherlands Navy if this navy interested in acquiring such destroyers. If so was the firm willing to act as intermediary with the British Admiralty for transferred those destroyers whose construction had progressed the farthest. The right procedure was that the firm contacted the Admiralty and not the Royal Netherlands Navy. The firm also did not contact other countries but would wait for a response within 3-4 weeks.

The Weapon-class destroyers had a displacement of around 1.950/2.000 (standard)-2.800 (full load) tons and as dimensions 350.0 (waterline)-365.0 (over all) x 38 x 20.9 (depth) feet. Oil fuel bunker capacity 690 tons. Horsepower 40.000 shp. The armament consisted of 3x2-4” Mk XVI guns, 2-4cm Bofors, 2x2-Oerlikons, 2x4-21” torpedo tubes, 2 depth charge throwers and 2 depth charge rails.

At that moment were 6 destroyers under construction of which 2 in a less advanced state in the meantime were cancelled by the British Admiralty. Of the remaining four were the dates

No. 1 to be launched in December 1945 and completed in June 1946.
No. 2 to be launched in May 1946 and completed in December 1946
No. 3 to be launched in September 1946 and completed in April 1947
No. 4 to be launched in February 1947 and completed in October 1947

The Dutch Minister however rejected the proposals and that if the Royal Netherlands Navy wanted to buy destroyers she only would deliberate with the British Admiralty and not otherwise. In the next months however tried the Netherlands to acquire 4 Battle-class (2) destroyers but refused for unknown reasons the offer for such destroyers and was again interested in Weapon-class destroyers for which these reasons did not apply. On 28 June 1946 asked the Minister the Dutch naval commander at London to inform if the Weapon-class destroyers were still available. On 23rd July informed the Military Branch the Dutch naval liaison officer captain lieutenant Krediet that there were none Weapon-class viable and that the cancelled ships were broken up. The Military Branch however had no doubts that Thornycroft would be interested in building two new ones. This was the only possibility to obtain Weapon-class destroyers.

Notes
1. Preceded by the C-class and preceded by the Battle-class of which 20 were planned, 16 cancelled and just 4 completed. Thornycroft built the Crossbow, Culverin, Howitzer and Longbow instead of six as mentioned in the correspondence. The Crossbow was laid down on 26 August 1944, launched on 20 December 1945, commissioned on 4 March 1948 and broken up in 1972. The Culvern was laid down on 27 April 1944, launched in March 1946 but broken up the same year. The Howitzer laid down on 26 February 1945 and the Longbow on 11 April 1945 were never launched and commissioned but cancelled on 15 October 1945 and broken up still on slip.
2. Preceded by the Weapon-class and succeeded by the Daring-class of which 26 were completed, originally ordered under the 1942 naval estimates and another two slightly enlarged groups under the 1943 and 1944 estimates of which the most were cancelled while the Second World War came to an end. Destroyers of this kind served in the British Royal Navy, Royal Australian Navy, Imperial Iranian Navy and the Pakistan Navy.

Source
National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. Ministerie van Marine. Commandant Marine London 1945-1947 inventory number 10. 

Royal Netherlands Navy purchasing LCM’s and LCT’s from the British Royal Navy at Singapore in 1946

On 25 February 1946 wrote the Dutch naval liaison officer captain K.J.F. Krediet the British Admiralty Secretary sir Henry V. Markham informing that the Royal Netherlands Navy in the Dutch East Indies took over from the British Royal Navy at Singapore six LCT’s and on short there also 12 LCM’s were to be taken over. He asked on behalf of the Royal Netherlands Navy what the costs were to be paid for these vessels.(1)

Note
1. LCT=Landing Craft Tank and LCM=Landing Craft Mechanized.

Source
National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. Ministerie van Marine. Commandant Marine London 1945-1947 inventory number 5. 

Royal Netherlands Navy wanted to buy Australian Bendigo-class minesweepers in 1945-1946

 Ternate (ex-Kalgoorlie). Source

On 1 December 1945 asked the Dutch naval liaison officer K.J.F. Krediet the British Admiralty Secretary sir Henry V. Markham that the Royal Netherlands Navy really would appreciate the transfer of 4 Bendigo-class motor minesweepers of the Royal Australian Navy. If a loan was not possible was a payment by the Netherlands acceptable.

In as second letter dated 16 March 1946 Krediet spoke about eight instead of four  if minesweepers as present in the Australian waters to the Royal Netherlands Navy. Krediet also wanted to know against which prise the vessels were sold. The Dutch naval representative in Australia informed Krediet that the present condition of the vessels was now 60%.(1)

Note
1. The Bathurst-class corvettes originally classified as minesweepers but usually called corvettes used for anti-submarine, anti-mine and convoy escort tasks. Full war load displacement of 1.025 tons and as dimensions 57x 9,4 x 2,6 metres or186 x 31 x 8.5 feet. Speed 15 knots and a crew numbering 85 men. Armament varied. The Royal Netherlands Navy bought indeed 8 of such vessels commissioned in 1946 as Ambon (ex-Cairns), Banda (ex-Woolongong), Batjan (ex-Lismore), Boereo (ex-Toowomba), Ceram (ex-Burnhie), Morotai (ex-Ipswich), Tidore (ex-Tamworth) and Ternate (ex-Kalgoorlie). Some of the vessels were later handed over to the Indonesian navy.

Source
National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. Ministerie van Marine. Commandant Marine London 1945-1947 inventory number 3.

Royal Netherlands Navy asked British Royal Navy for loaning former German minesweepers in 1945

In his letter dated 14 November 1945 asked the Dutch naval liaison officer captain Krediet the British Admiralty if it was possible to loan six former German R-boats to be used for minesweeping tasks in the European waters and especially not in the Far East. They were to be manned by Dutch sailors. He suggested to use one of the German flotillas already active out of Dutch ports of which the boats were fitted out with ordinary screws. If this load was approved the Royal Netherlands Navy intended to return to the Admiralty the motor launches (ML.s) 138, 143, 161-162, 164 and 260 which she al that moment loaned. Further more referred Krediet to a letter dated 20th October 1945 in which for a period of 3 months the loan of 4 Cropesa fitted motor launches (ML.s) was approved.

In a response dated 29th December 1945 wrote the secretary of the admiralty to captain K.J.F. Krediet of D.N.L.O. that he hoped that on short notice a flotilla would be available and that at the moment was considered what would be the most suitable to meet the Dutch requirements.

Source
National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. Ministerie van Marine. Commandant Marine London 1945-1947 inventory number 2

Monday, 16 April 2018

British patrol annex training vessel HMS Trumpeter (P294) 1988-

Schelde off Vlssingen, Netherlands 2 April 2018

Of the Archer-class. In the past used by the Bristol University Royal Naval Unit, nowadays used by the Cambridge University Royal Naval Unit. Built at Vosper Thornycroft. Commissioned in 1988. Displacement 49-54 tonnes and as dimensions 20,8 x 5,8 x 1,8 metres. Or 68’3”x 19’x 5’11”Speed maximum 13 knots. Range 550 nautical miles. Homeport HMNB Clyde. Her crew numbers 18 men. Armament consisted of 3-7,62mm machineguns and a possibility for placing 1-2cm gun.

River gunboats sighted at Braila, Romania, according to a CIA report dated 29 April 1952

An item reported that on 3 January 1952 two yet not completed river gunboats being town upstream were sighted at Braila, Romania. Aft were platforms visible probably for mounting anti aircraft guns. The freeboard was very little.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R011700040004-8

The fleet of the Albanian navy according to a CIA report dated 5 May 1952

An item reported that the Albanian navy possessed 8 motorboats of the same size as the Italian MAS boats although with a particularly high bow and a prominent bridge of the captain. The machinery consisted of diesel engines and the armament of 1-2cm gun. Fitted out with radio equipment. In January 1951 (?)were all boats stationed at Durres except the one for Saseno.

Furthermore there were 3 larger wood-hulled motorboats arriving in August 1950 coming from Poland. The armament consisted of 2x104m guns (1 fore, 1aft) in such a manner mounted that an easy removal was possible. All there boats laid up in reserve,

Last but not least were an unarmed motor boat heavier than the MAS a look alike motor boats used as deputyship for the ‘MAS’-squadron and a 1-masted caique serving as a transport.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R011800150005-4

Bulgarian naval and anti-amphibious mines 1912-1918

Military Museum Sofia, Bulgaria

The Bulgarian navy used these floating pointers in the Balkan Wars between 1912 and 1913 and in the First World War 1915-1918.